Biography & Autobiography

The Long, Bitter Trail

Author: Anthony Wallace

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 143

View: 144

An account of Andrew Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830, which relocated Eastern Indians to the Okalahoma Territory over the Trail of Tears, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs which was given control over their lives.
Biography & Autobiography

The Long, Bitter Trail

Author: Anthony Wallace

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 143

View: 225

An account of Andrew Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830, which relocated Eastern Indians to the Okalahoma Territory over the Trail of Tears, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs which was given control over their lives.
Juvenile Nonfiction

Cherokee Nation V. Georgia

Author: Nathan Aaseng

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 96

View: 887

Describes the attempts to protect the rights of Cherokees living in Georgia beginning in the colonial period, including the landmark Supreme Court cases, Cherokee Nation vs. Georgia, and Worcester vs. Georgia.
History

The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears

Author: Theda Perdue

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 227

Today, a fraction of the Cherokee people remains in their traditional homeland in the southern Appalachians. Most Cherokees were forcibly relocated to eastern Oklahoma in the early nineteenth century. In 1830 the U.S. government shifted its policy from one of trying to assimilate American Indians to one of relocating them and proceeded to drive seventeen thousand Cherokee people west of the Mississippi. The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears recounts this moment in American history and considers its impact on the Cherokee, on U.S.-Indian relations, and on contemporary society. Guggenheim Fellowship-winning historian Theda Perdue and coauthor Michael D. Green explain the various and sometimes competing interests that resulted in the Cherokee?s expulsion, follow the exiles along the Trail of Tears, and chronicle their difficult years in the West after removal.
History

The Rise and Fall of the American System

Author: Songho Ha

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 882

The American System was implemented by the US government after the American-British War of 1812 to develop a national domestic market. This study explores the rise and fall of the system between its inception in 1790 and the Panic of 1837.
United States

Taking Sides

Author: Larry Madaras

Publisher: McGraw-Hill College

ISBN:

Category: United States

Page: 408

View: 344

Presents opposing viewpoints on seventeen controversial issues in American history, covering a period that ranges from colonial times to Reconstruction.
History

American Indians and the Rhetoric of Removal and Allotment

Author: Jason Edward Black

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 223

Jason Edward Black examines the ways the US government’s rhetoric and American Indian responses contributed to the policies of Native-US relations throughout the nineteenth century’s removal and allotment eras. Black shows how these discourses together constructed the perception of the US government and of American Indian communities. Such interactions—though certainly not equal—illustrated the hybrid nature of Native-US rhetoric in the nineteenth century. Both governmental, colonizing discourse and indigenous, decolonizing discourse shaped arguments, constructions of identity, and rhetoric in the colonial relationship. American Indians and the Rhetoric of Removal and Allotment demonstrates how American Indians decolonized dominant rhetoric through impeding removal and allotment policies. By turning around the US government’s narrative and inventing their own tactics, American Indian communities helped restyle their own identities as well as the government’s. During the first third of the twentieth century, American Indians lobbied for the successful passage of the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924 and the Indian New Deal of 1934, changing the relationship once again. In the end, Native communities were granted increased rhetorical power through decolonization, though the US government retained an undeniable colonial influence through its territorial management of Natives. The Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian New Deal—as the conclusion of this book indicates—are emblematic of the prevalence of the duality of US citizenship that fused American Indians to the nation, yet segregated them on reservations. This duality of inclusion and exclusion grew incrementally and persists now, as a lasting effect of nineteenth-century Native-US rhetorical relations.
Religion

A Bitter Trial

Author: Evelyn Waugh

Publisher: Ignatius Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 128

View: 624

"In John Carmel Cardinal Heenan, Waugh found a sympathetic pastor and somewhat of a kindred spirit. This volume brings together the personal correspondence between Waugh and Heenan during the 1960s." - publishers description.
History

The Colfax Massacre

Author: LeeAnna Keith

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 219

View: 387

Drawing on a large body of documents, including eyewitness accounts and evidence from the site itself, Keith explores the racial tensions that led to the Colfax massacre - during which surrendering blacks were mercilessly slaughtered - and the reverberations this message of terror sent throughout the South.
Law

Cases, Materials and Problems in Property, 2010

Author: Richard H. Chused

Publisher: LexisNexis

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 1572

View: 955

This casebook raises interesting and challenging problems concerning the development of property law. Property concepts are introduced through cutting edge issues, such as intellectual property, rights of publicity, and ownership rights in the human body. Historical dimensions are presented through discussions of laws which formerly excluded certain individuals from most forms of ownership and property control, such as Native Americans, African Americans, and women. The text covers traditional topics: estates in land, landlord and tenant laws, transfers of property, private land use controls, and constitutional limitations on public land use controls. Most chapters are preceded by a concise summary of legal doctrines or common themes covered in the chapter. Explanatory Notes provide extensive explanations of cases and rules; they clarify complicated opinions with background information regarding the circumstances giving rise to the proceedings. Problems and Problem Notes take students beyond the realm of settled rules to generate analysis of the purpose behind the rules. This book also points students to relevant secondary sources for a broader understanding of property law. This eBook features links to Lexis Advance for further legal research options.
History

What Hath God Wrought

Author: Daniel Walker Howe

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 928

View: 669

The Oxford History of the United States is by far the most respected multi-volume history of our nation. In this Pulitzer prize-winning, critically acclaimed addition to the series, historian Daniel Walker Howe illuminates the period from the battle of New Orleans to the end of the Mexican-American War, an era when the United States expanded to the Pacific and won control over the richest part of the North American continent. A panoramic narrative, What Hath God Wrought portrays revolutionary improvements in transportation and communications that accelerated the extension of the American empire. Railroads, canals, newspapers, and the telegraph dramatically lowered travel times and spurred the spread of information. These innovations prompted the emergence of mass political parties and stimulated America's economic development from an overwhelmingly rural country to a diversified economy in which commerce and industry took their place alongside agriculture. In his story, the author weaves together political and military events with social, economic, and cultural history. Howe examines the rise of Andrew Jackson and his Democratic party, but contends that John Quincy Adams and other Whigs--advocates of public education and economic integration, defenders of the rights of Indians, women, and African-Americans--were the true prophets of America's future. In addition, Howe reveals the power of religion to shape many aspects of American life during this period, including slavery and antislavery, women's rights and other reform movements, politics, education, and literature. Howe's story of American expansion culminates in the bitterly controversial but brilliantly executed war waged against Mexico to gain California and Texas for the United States. Winner of the New-York Historical Society American History Book Prize Finalist, 2007 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction The Oxford History of the United States The Oxford History of the United States is the most respected multi-volume history of our nation. The series includes three Pulitzer Prize winners, a New York Times bestseller, and winners of the Bancroft and Parkman Prizes. The Atlantic Monthly has praised it as "the most distinguished series in American historical scholarship," a series that "synthesizes a generation's worth of historical inquiry and knowledge into one literally state-of-the-art book." Conceived under the general editorship of C. Vann Woodward and Richard Hofstadter, and now under the editorship of David M. Kennedy, this renowned series blends social, political, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military history into coherent and vividly written narrative.
Literary Criticism

Best Books for High School Readers

Author: John Thomas Gillespie

Publisher: Libraries Unltd Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1182

View: 229

Provides an annotated listing of recommended reading material for students in grades nine through twelve, or ages fifteen through eighteen.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Public Library Catalog

Author: Juliette Yaakov

Publisher: Hw Wilson Company

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 1445

View: 558

In librarian's office.
History

Major Problems in American Foreign Relations, Volume I: To 1920

Author: Dennis Merrill

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 617

Designed to encourage critical thinking about history, this reader uses a carefully selected group of primary sources and analytical essays to allow students to test the interpretations of distinguished historians and draw their own conclusions about the history of American foreign policy. This text serves as an effective educational tool for courses on U.S. foreign policy, recent U.S. history, or 20th Century U.S. history. The Seventh Edition introduces new studies on America's early foreign relations which seek to position the nation's post 9-11 attitudes and behaviors within historical context. Some of the new literature spotlights cultural relations, and the ways in which culturally constructed attitudes about class, gender, race, and national identity have shaped American's perceptions of the world and subsequently its overseas relationships. In this volume, almost one-half of the essays are new, including selections by Michael L. Krenn, Walter A. Hixson, Robert Kagan, John Lamberton Harper, Marie-Jeanne Rossignol, Joseph J. Ellis, John E. Lewis Jr., Piero Gleijeses, Stuart Banner, McCabe Keliher, Michael H. Hunt, Kristin L. Hoganson, Paul A. Kramer, Stanley Karnow, Robert W. Tucker, and Erez Manela. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
History

Rivers of Sand

Author: Christopher D. Haveman

Publisher: Indians of the Southeast

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 438

View: 895

A study of the Creek home front in Alabama during the removal period, their experiences moving west, and the ways they reestablished their lives in Oklahoma Territory.
Social Science

The Encyclopedia of North American Indian Wars, 1607–1890: A Political, Social, and Military History [3 volumes]

Author: Spencer C. Tucker

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 1318

View: 640

This encyclopedia provides a broad, in-depth, and multidisciplinary look at the causes and effects of warfare between whites and Native Americans, encompassing nearly three centuries of history. • Entries written by over 50 leading scholars in the field • 25 charts • 26 maps • A glossary of terms
History

The Social History of Crime and Punishment in America: A-De

Author: Wilbur R. Miller

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 2606

View: 524

Several encyclopedias overview the contemporary system of criminal justice in America, but full understanding of current social problems and contemporary strategies to deal with them can come only with clear appreciation of the historical underpinnings of those problems. Thus, this four-volume work surveys the history and philosophy of crime, punishment, and criminal justice institutions in America from colonial times to the present. It covers the whole of the criminal justice system, from crimes, law enforcement and policing, to courts, corrections and human services. Among other things, this encyclopedia will: explicate philosophical foundations underpinning our system of justice; chart changing patterns in criminal activity and subsequent effects on legal responses; identify major periods in the development of our system of criminal justice; and explore evolving debates and conflicts on how best to address issues of crime and punishment. Its signed entries provide the historical context for students to better understand contemporary criminological debates and the contemporary shape of the U.S. system of law and justice.
History

William Clark's World

Author: Peter J. Kastor

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 545

By examining the life and career of William Clark, this book explores how the North American West entered the American imagination. Clark was among the most important western officials of his generation, and he worked to represent the West during a period of tremendous uncertainty and change. Without ever calling himself a writer or an artist, Clark nonetheless drew maps, helped to produce books, drafted lengthy reports, surveyed the landscape, and wrote numerous journals that made sense of the West and its future for Americans who were fascinated by the region's potential but also fearful of its dangers. William Clark's World situates the descriptive words and pictures created by Clark and his contemporaries at the center of a discussion of western history and cultural development. The book casts new light on the familiar narrative of manifest destiny and on the nation's view of the West in the early nineteenth century. --Book Jacket.
Accidents

Disasters, Accidents, and Crises in American History

Author: Ballard C. Campbell

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Accidents

Page: 481

View: 217

Presents a chronologically-arranged reference to catastrophic events in American history, including natural disasters, economic depressions, riots, murders, and terrorist attacks.