Fiction

The Minority Report

Author: Philip K. Dick

Publisher: Pantheon

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 103

View: 577

Commissioner John Anderton's clever use of the Precrime System, which uses "precogs," people with the ability to see into the future, to identify criminals before they can do any harm, is confronted with a serious glitch when his precogs identify Anderton himself as the next criminal and he must race against time to save himself. 25,000 first printing.
Crime prevention

Minority Report

Author: Philip K. Dick

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Crime prevention

Page: 290

View: 915

Imagine a future where crimes can be detected before they are committed, and criminals are convicted and sentenced for crimes before committing them. This is the scenario of Philip K. Dick's classic story, now filmed by Steven Spielberg, starring Tom Cruise. In addition to 'Minority Report' this exclusive collection includes nine other outstanding short stories by the twentieth century's outstanding sf master, three of which have been made into feature films.

Cyberpunk Films

Author: General Books LLC

Publisher: Books LLC, Wiki Series

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 236

View: 379

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Commentary (films not included). Pages: 90. Chapters: The Matrix, Blade Runner, Until the End of the World, The Matrix Reloaded, Minority Report, Total Recall, Johnny Mnemonic, Tron: Legacy, The Animatrix, Akira, RoboCop, Avalon, Godkiller, Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence, The Matrix Revolutions, RoboCop 2, Eden Log, RoboCop 3, Strange Days, I.K.U., Renaissance, Resurrection of the Little Match Girl, Sleep Dealer, Nemesis, Megaville, Revenge Quest, Nirvana, Paranoia 1.0, Max Headroom: 20 Minutes into the Future, The Gene Generation, Technotise: Edit & I, Gunhed, Class of 1999, Ghost in the Machine, The Helix...Loaded, Avatar, New Rose Hotel, Assault Girls, Wax or the Discovery of Television Among the Bees, Kamikaze 1989. Excerpt: Minority Report is a 2002 American neo-noir science fiction film directed by Steven Spielberg and loosely based on the short story "The Minority Report" by Philip K. Dick. It is set primarily in Washington, D.C. and Northern Virginia in the year 2054, where "PreCrime," a specialized police department, apprehends criminals based on foreknowledge provided by three psychics called "precogs." The cast includes Tom Cruise as PreCrime captain John Anderton, Colin Farrell as Department of Justice agent Danny Witwer, Samantha Morton as the senior precog Agatha, and Max von Sydow as Anderton's superior Lamar Burgess. The film is a combination of whodunit, thriller, and science fiction. Spielberg has characterized the story as "fifty percent character and fifty percent very complicated storytelling with layers and layers of murder mystery and plot." The film's central theme is the question of free will vs. determinism. It examines whether free will can exist if the future is set and known in advance. Other themes include the role of preventative government in protecting its citizenry, the role of media in a future state ...
Philosophy

Minority Report

Author: William T. Lynch

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 380

View: 103

In Philip K. Dick’s The Minority Report, ‘precogs’, who are imaginary individuals capable of seeing the future are relied upon to stop crime, with a consensus report synthesized from two of three precogs. When the protaganist is indicted for a future murder, he suspects a conspiracy and seeks out the “minority report,” detailing the suppressed testimony of the third precog. Science works a lot like this science fiction story. Contrary to the view that scientists in a field all share the same “paradigm,” as Thomas Kuhn famously argued, scientists support different, and competing, research programs. Statements of scientific consensus need to be actively synthesized from the work of different scientists. Not all scientific work will be equally credited by science as a whole. While this system works well enough for most purposes, it is possible for minority views to fail to get the hearing that they deserve. This book analyzes the support that should be given to minority views, reconsidering classic debates in Science and Technology Studies and examining numerous case studies.
Biography & Autobiography

Minority Report

Author: H. L. Mencken

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 293

View: 280

With a style that combined biting sarcasm with the "language of the free lunch counter," Henry Louis Mencken shook politics and politicians for nearly half a century. Now, fifty years after Mencken’s death, the Johns Hopkins University Press announces The Buncombe Collection, newly packaged editions of nine Mencken classics: Happy Days, Heathen Days, Newspaper Days, Prejudices, Treatise on the Gods, On Politics, Thirty-Five Years of Newspaper Work, Minority Report, and A Second Mencken Chrestomathy. In 1956, Mencken read through his notebooks and extracted those pieces he thought truest, most pertinent, most precise, or most likely to blow the dust out of a reader's brain.
Social Science

The Minority Report

Author: Anthony Gary Dworkin

Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 465

View: 597

Combining text and readings in a single book, this volume (a joint venture by the authors and the Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) of the American Sociological Association) includes a comprehensive theory section and a wide variety of applications of the theory to the experiences of different groups.
Social Science

Minority Report

Author: John D. Griffin

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 292

Are the views of Latinos and African Americans underrepresented in our federal government? For that matter, what does it mean to be represented equitably? Rather than taking for granted a single answer to these complex questions, John Griffin and Brian Newman use different measures of political equality to reveal which groups get what they want from government and what factors lead to their successes. One of the first books to compare the representation of both African Americans and Latinos to that of whites, Minority Report shows that congressional decisions and federal policy tend to mirror the preferences of whites as a group and as individuals better than the preferences of either minority group, even after accounting for income disparities. This is far from the whole story, though, and the authors’ multifaceted approach illustrates the surprising degree to which group population size, an issue’s level of importance, the race or ethnicity of an office holder, and electoral turnout can affect how well government action reflects the views of each person or group. Sure to be controversial, Minority Report ultimately goes beyond statistical analyses to address the root question of what equal representation really means.