Literary Criticism

The Oxford History of the Novel in English

Author: J. Gerald Kennedy

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 656

View: 296

The Oxford History of the Novel in English is a 12-volume series presenting a comprehensive, global, and up-to-date history of English-language prose fiction and written by a large, international team of scholars. The series is concerned with novels as a whole, not just the "literary" novel, and each volume includes chapters on the processes of production, distribution, and reception, and on popular fiction and the fictional sub-genres, as well as outlining the work of major novelists, movements, traditions, and tendencies. In thirty-four essays, this volume reconstructs the emergence and early cultivation of the novel in the United States. Contributors discuss precursors to the U.S. novel that appeared as colonial histories, autobiographies, diaries, and narratives of Indian captivity, religious conversion, and slavery, while paying attention to the entangled literary relations that gave way to a distinctly American cultural identity. The Puritan past, more than two centuries of Indian wars, the American Revolution, and the exploration of the West all inspired fictions of American struggle and self-discovery. A fragmented national publishing landscape comprised of small, local presses often disseminating odd, experimental forms eventually gave rise to major houses in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia and a consequently robust culture of letters. "Dime novels", literary magazines, innovative print technology, and even favorable postal rates contributed to the burgeoning domestic book trade in place by the time of the Missouri Compromise. Contributors weigh novelists of this period alongside their most enduring fictional works to reveal how even the most "American" of novels sometimes confronted the inhuman practices upon which the promise of the new republic had been made to depend. Similarly, the volume also looks at efforts made to extend American interests into the wider world beyond the nation's borders, and it thoroughly documents the emergence of novels projecting those imperial aspirations.
Literary Criticism

The Oxford History of the Novel in English

Author: John Kucich

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 548

View: 751

This series presents a comprehensive, global and up-to-date history of English-language prose fiction and written ... by a international team of scholars ... -- dust jacket.
Literary Criticism

The Novel in Africa and the Caribbean since 1950

Author: Simon Gikandi

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 592

View: 667

Why did the novel take such a long time to emerge in the colonial world? And, what cultural work did it come to perform in societies where subjects were not free and modes of social organization diverged from the European cultural centers where the novel gained its form and audience? Answering these questions and more, Volume 11, The Novel in Africa and the Caribbean since 1950 explores the institutions of cultural production that exerted influence in late colonialism, from missionary schools and metropolitan publishers to universities and small presses. How these structures provoke and respond to the literary trends and social peculiarities of Africa and the Caribbean impacts not only the writing and reading of novels in those regions, but also has a transformative effect on the novel as a global phenomenon. Together, the volume's 32 contributing experts tell a story about the close relationship between the novel and the project of decolonization, and explore the multiple ways in which novels enable readers to imagine communities beyond their own and thus made this form of literature a compelling catalyst for cultural transformation. The authors show that, even as the novel grows in Africa and the Caribbean as a mark of the elites' mastery of European form, it becomes the essential instrument for critiquing colonialism and for articulating the new horizons of cultural nationalism. Within this historical context, the volume examines works by authors such as Chinua Achebe, Nadine Gordimer, George Lamming, Jamaica Kincaid, V.S. Naipaul, Zoe Wicomb, J. M. Coetzee, and many others.

The Oxford History of the Novel in English

Author: Ralph Crane

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 512

View: 499

This volume in The Oxford History of the Novel in English series discusses novels written in English throughout the world except for Britain, Ireland and the United States in the period up to 1950. The book contains survey essays and essays on major writers, as well as essays on book history and publishing and the critical contexts of the work discussed. The book, then, contains essays on the development of the non-metropolitan novel throughout the British worldfrom the eighteenth to the mid twentieth centuries. This is the period of empire and resistance to empire, of settler confidence giving way to doubt, and of the rise of indigenous and post-colonialnationalisms that would shape the world after World War II.
Literary Criticism

The Oxford History of the Novel in English

Author: Priscilla Wald

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 656

View: 416

Witnessing the end of a war that nearly terminated the nation, the abolition of racial slavery and rise of legal segregation, the rise of Modernism and Hollywood, the closing of the frontier and two World Wars, the literary historical period represented in this volume constitutes the crucible of American literary history. Here, 35 essays by top researchers in the field detail how considerations of race and citizenship; immigration and assimilation; gender and sexuality; nationalism and empire; all reverberate throughout novels written in the United States between 1870 and 1940. Contributors discuss the professionalization of literary production after the Civil War alongside legal and political debates over segregation and citizenship; while chapters on journalism, geography, religion, and immigration offer discussions on everything from the lasting role of literary realism in American fiction to the Spanish-American War's effect on developing theories of aesthetics and popular culture. The volume offers thorough coverage of the emergence of serial fiction, children's fiction, crime and detective fiction, science fiction, and even cinema and comics, as new media and artistic revolutions like the Harlem Renaissance helped usher in the new international aesthetic movement of Modernism. The final chapters in the volume explore the relationship of the novel to the emergence of "American literature" as a category in the academy, in public criticism and journalism, and in mass culture.
Books and reading

The Oxford History of the Novel in English

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Books and reading

Page:

View: 458

This series presents a comprehensive, global and up-to-date history of English-language prose fiction and written ... by a international team of scholars ... -- dust jacket.