Law

The Reasonable Robot

Author: Ryan Abbott

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page:

View: 532

Today, artificial intelligence (AI) and people do not compete on a level playing field. From a safety perspective, AI may be the best choice for driving a vehicle, but laws often prohibit driverless vehicles. At the same time, a person may be better at packing boxes at a warehouse, but a business may automate because AI receives preferential tax treatment. Or, AI may be better at helping businesses to innovate, but these same businesses may not want to use AI if doing so restricts future intellectual property rights. In The Reasonable Robot, Ryan Abbott argues that the law should not discriminate between people and AI when they are performing the same tasks, a legal standard that will help to eliminate market distortions and to ensure that decisions are made on the basis of efficiency. This work should be read by anyone interested in the rapidly evolving relationship between AI and the law.
Business & Economics

The Reasonable Robot

Author: Ryan Abbott

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 165

View: 452

Argues that treating people and artificial intelligence differently under the law results in unexpected and harmful outcomes for social welfare.
Political Science

Ethics and Security Automata

Author: Sean Welsh

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 220

View: 108

Can security automata (robots and AIs) make moral decisions to apply force on humans correctly? If they can make such decisions, ought they be used to do so? Will security automata increase or decrease aggregate risk to humans? What regulation is appropriate? Addressing these important issues this book examines the political and technical challenges of the robotic use of force. The book presents accessible practical examples of the ‘machine ethics’ technology likely to be installed in military and police robots and also in civilian robots with everyday security functions such as childcare. By examining how machines can pass ‘reasonable person’ tests to demonstrate measurable levels of moral competence and display the ability to determine the ‘spirit’ as well as the ‘letter of the law’, the author builds upon existing research to define conditions under which robotic force can and ought to be used to enhance human security. The scope of the book is thus far broader than ‘shoot to kill’ decisions by autonomous weapons, and should attract readers from the fields of ethics, politics, and legal, military and international affairs. Researchers in artificial intelligence and robotics will also find it useful.
Business & Economics

We, the Robots?

Author: Simon Chesterman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 311

View: 572

Explains how artificial intelligence is pushing the limits of the law and how we must respond.
Religion

Robot Theology

Author: Joshua K. Smith

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 154

View: 994

What is the relationship between artificial intelligence, robots, and theology? The connections are much closer than one might think. There is a deep spiritual longing in the world of AI and robotics. Technology is a prayer; it reveals the depth of our eschatology. Through the study of AI and robotic literature one can see a clear desire to both transcend human limitations and overcome the fallenness of human nature. The questions of ethics, power, and responsibility are not new to Christian anthropology. This book will introduce and examine some of the major ethical issues surrounding current AI and robotic technology from a theological and philosophical lens. In the study of AI and robot ethics, the Christian community has a chance to join the global efforts to build technology for good. Will we join them?
Law

Liability for Artificial Intelligence and the Internet of Things

Author: Sebastian Lohsse

Publisher: Nomos Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 235

View: 992

Wissenschaftler und Praktiker aus mehreren europäischen Ländern befassen sich in dem Band mit Grundfragen der Haftung für die Herstellung und Verwendung künstlicher Intelligenz. Sie entwickeln vor dem Hintergrund der Gesetzgebungsinitiativen auf nationaler und europäischer Ebene (wie der Resolution des Europäischen Parlaments über "Civil Law Rules on Robotics") Analysen und Lösungsvorschläge zur Fortentwicklung der Produkthaftung, zur Anpassung traditioneller Konzepte des Deliktsrechts und zur Funktion von Gefährdungshaftungstatbeständen. Die Reihe der "Münster Colloquia on EU Law and the Digital Economy" wendet sich damit einer vordringlichen Herausforderung für Rechtswissenschaft und Praxis zu. Mit Beiträgen von Cristina Amato, Georg Borges, Jean-Sébastien Borghetti, Giovanni Comandé, Ernst Karner, Bernhard Koch, Sebastian Lohsse, Eva Lux, Miquel Martín-Casals, Reiner Schulze, Gerald Spindler, Dirk Staudenmayer, Gerhard Wagner, Herbert Zech
Law

Lethal Autonomous Weapons

Author: Jai Galliott

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page:

View: 443

The question of whether new rules or regulations are required to govern, restrict, or even prohibit the use of autonomous weapon systems has been the subject of debate for the better part of a decade. Despite the claims of advocacy groups, the way ahead remains unclear since the international community has yet to agree on a specific definition of Lethal Autonomous Weapon Systems and the great powers have largely refused to support an effective ban. In this vacuum, the public has been presented with a heavily one-sided view of Killer Robots. This volume presents a more nuanced approach to autonomous weapon systems that recognizes the need to progress beyond a discourse framed by the Terminator and HAL 9000. Re-shaping the discussion around this emerging military innovation requires a new line of thought and a willingness to challenge the orthodoxy. Lethal Autonomous Weapons focuses on exploring the moral and legal issues associated with the design, development and deployment of lethal autonomous weapons. In this volume, we bring together some of the most prominent academics and academic-practitioners in the lethal autonomous weapons space and seek to return some balance to the debate. As part of this effort, we recognize that society needs to invest in hard conversations that tackle the ethics, morality, and law of these new digital technologies and understand the human role in their creation and operation.
Law

Complex Battlespaces

Author: Christopher M. Ford

Publisher: Lieber Studies

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 553

View: 950

"This workshop, Complex Battlespaces: The Law of Armed Conflict and the Dynamics of Modern Warfare, was held at West Point on October 24-26, 2016. It marked the official opening of the Lieber Institute." -- ECIP forword.
Law

Artificial Intelligence, Design Law and Fashion

Author: Hasan Kadir Yılmaztekin

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 203

View: 667

Artificial intelligence (AI) now infiltrates our culture. After a couple of difficult winters, AI today is a word on everybody’s lips, and it attracts everyone’s attention regardless of whether they are experts or not. From Apple’s Siri to Amazon’s Alexa, Tesla’s auto-driving cars to facial recognition systems in CCTV cameras, Netflix’s film offering services to Google’s search engine, we live in a world of AI goods. The advent of AI-powered technologies increasingly affects people’s lives across the globe. As a tool for productivity and cost-efficiency, AI also shapes our economy and welfare. AI-generated designs and works are becoming more popular. Today, AI technologies can generate several intellectual creations. Fashion is one of the industries that AI can profoundly impact. AI tools and devices are currently being used in the fashion industry to create fashion models, fabric and jewellery designs, and clothing. When we talk about AI-generated designs, we instead focus on the fruits of innovation – more best-selling apparels, more fashionable designs and more fulfilment of customer expectations – without paying heed to who the designer is. Designers invest a lot of talent, time and finances into designing and creating each article of clothing and accessory before they release their work to the public. Pattern drafting is the first and most important step in dressmaking. Designers typically start with a general sketch on paper; add styles, elements and colours; revise and refine everything; and finally deliver their design to dressmakers. AI accelerates this time-consuming and labour-intensive process. Yet the full legal consequences of AI in fashion industry are often forgotten. An AI device’s ability to generate fashion designs raises the question of who will own intellectual property rights over the fashion designs. Will it be the fashion designer who hires or contracts with the AI programmer? Will it be the programmer? Will it be the AI itself? Or will it be a joint work of humans and computers? And who will be liable for infringement deriving from use of third-party material in AI-generated fashion designs? This book explores answers to these questions within the framework of EU design and copyright laws. It also crafts a solution proposal based on a three-step test and model norms, which could be used to unleash the authors, rights holders and infringers around AI-generated fashion designs.