Biography & Autobiography

The Recollections Of Rifleman Bowlby

Author: Alex Bowlby

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 480

'One of the great Second World War memoirs ... will be read as long as that war is remembered' John Keegan 'Extraordinary realism' SUNDAY TIMES 'A touch of the Somme and more than a hint of Wilfred Owen' TLS A classic of WWII, this is the vivid memoir of Private Bowlby, who came through the North Africa campaign only to have to battle in bitter fighting against a stubborn and skilled German defence in Italy. It is a truly authentic account of what it was like to fight your way through one of the most gruelling and dangerous campaigns of the Second World War, where so often the hunters became the hunted.
World War, 1939-1945

Recollections of Rifleman Bowl

Author: Alex Bowlby

Publisher: Arrow

ISBN:

Category: World War, 1939-1945

Page: 272

View: 118

This is Rifleman Bowlby's account of life in an infantry platoon in Italy in 1944. The battalion in which he served had been renowned throughout the 8th Army, but by the time it arrived in Italy it had been stripped of its core of regulars and its specialist role. Now used as heavy infantry, it lost its first battle, then its second, and the reputation that had taken three years to build fell apart in a few weeks. Only in its last battle, when it was smashed to pieces on the Gothic line, did the battalion regain its esteem.
History

Recollections of Rifleman Bowlby

Author: Alex Bowlby

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 977

In 1944, having distinguished itself in the North Africa campaign, Rifleman Bowlby's battalion of Greenjackets was sent to Italy. But instead of being used in the specialised role for which it had been trained, most of the battalion's vehicles were taken away on arrival, and the riflemen were told that they were to be used as ordinary infantry. Stripped of its hard core of regulars, the battalion suffered one disastrous defeat after another until its hard-won reputation fell in tatters. 'Quite extraordinary realism in this worm's eye view ... The sweating, slogging, frightened infantryman in conditions of extreme stress and horror. It is a book to bring a shiver to the most grizzled veteran.' Sunday Times
History

Recollections of Rifleman Bowlby

Author: Alex Bowlby

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 406

In 1944, having distinguished itself in the North Africa campaign, Rifleman Bowlby's battalion of Greenjackets was sent to Italy. But instead of being used in the specialised role for which it had been trained, most of the battalion's vehicles were taken away on arrival, and the riflemen were told that they were to be used as ordinary infantry. Stripped of its hard core of regulars, the battalion suffered one disastrous defeat after another until its hard-won reputation fell in tatters. 'Quite extraordinary realism in this worm's eye view ... The sweating, slogging, frightened infantryman in conditions of extreme stress and horror. It is a book to bring a shiver to the most grizzled veteran.' Sunday Times
History

A War of Nerves

Author: Ben Shephard

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 487

View: 447

This is a history of military psychiatry in the twentieth century. Both absorbing historical narrative and intellectual detective story, it weaves literary, medical, and military lore to give us a fascinating history of war neuroses and their treatment, from the World Wars through Vietnam and up to the Gulf War.
History

The Veterans' Tale

Author: Frances Houghton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 782

This is a unique account of the ways in which British veterans of the Second World War remembered, understood, and recounted their experiences of battle throughout the post-war period. Focusing on themes of landscape, weaponry, the enemy, and comradeship, Frances Houghton examines the imagery and language used by war memoirists to reconstruct and review both their experiences of battle and their sense of wartime self. Houghton also identifies how veterans' memoirs became significant sites of contest as former servicemen sought to challenge what they saw as unsatisfactory official, scholarly, and cultural representations of the Second World War in Britain. Her findings show that these memoirs are equally important both for the new light they shed on the memory and meanings of wartime military experience among British veterans, and for what they tell us about the cultural identity of military life-writing in post-war British society.
History

Countdown to Cassino

Author: Alex Bowlby

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 221

View: 409

In the autumn of 1943 the German Bernhardt Line ran through Mignano Gap, 12 miles south-west of Cassino. XIV Panzer Korps was to make a stand there, holding up the advancing US 5th Army - two thirds American, one third British - whilst Cassino was being fortified. If the 5th Army broke through Mignano Gap before Cassino's fortifications were really strong, Allied armour would smash its way through the town and go on to take Rome. Drawing on the memories of veterans who fought at Mignano Gap, and on extensive archive research, this book presents a wide-ranging account of this major battle, and describes how close the 5th Army came to making the crucial breakthrough. The author served with the Green Jackets in World War II and his 1969 publication, "The Recollections of Rifleman Bowlby", was republished 20 years later.
History

Up Close and Personal

Author: David Lee

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 774

This gripping book is about what it was really like to fight at the sharp end in World War II. In 1947, US General S. L. A Marshall controversially wrote that out of every one hundred combat soldiers only fifteen to twenty-five actually fired their weapons at the enemy, because of the innate human reluctance to take another's life. Others maintained the opposite view that soldiers enjoyed killing. David Lee demonstrates that the situation was far more complex than either of these positions, arguing that the crucial factor for a unit s success in battle was the type of training it received. To illustrate this Lee covers actions from each theatre of the war, in depth and with comprehensive coverage of weapons and tactics. First there is the story of what happened when a battalion of British soldiers trained in the traditional manner came up against the Waffen SS, whose training was formidable and bore close resemblance to the Commandos . The success of No. 4 Commando at Dieppe is covered to show how this was put into effect. For the desert war there is a detailed look at how a rifle battalion held the snipe position against overwhelming odds, and how that same battalion was virtually wiped out when it later went to Italy. For the Far East, Lee explains how hatred of the Japanese Army gave impetus to British soldiers fighting at Kohima and American soldiers at Iwo Jima. And finally there is the story of one US infantry regiment on D-Day.
History

Browned Off and Bloody-Minded

Author: Alan Allport

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 923

More than three-and-a-half million men served in the British Army during the Second World War, the vast majority of them civilians who had never expected to become soldiers and had little idea what military life, with all its strange rituals, discomforts, and dangers, was going to be like. Alan Allport’s rich and luminous social history examines the experience of the greatest and most terrible war in history from the perspective of these ordinary, extraordinary men, who were plucked from their peacetime families and workplaces and sent to fight for King and Country. Allport chronicles the huge diversity of their wartime trajectories, tracing how soldiers responded to and were shaped by their years with the British Army, and how that army, however reluctantly, had to accommodate itself to them. Touching on issues of class, sex, crime, trauma, and national identity, through a colorful multitude of fresh individual perspectives, the book provides an enlightening, deeply moving perspective on how a generation of very modern-minded young men responded to the challenges of a brutal and disorienting conflict.
History

Raising Churchill's Army

Author: David French

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 298

This is the first serious analysis of the combat capability of the British army in the Second World War. It sweeps away the myth that the army suffered from poor morale, and that it only won its battles thorugh the use of 'brute force' and by reverting to the techniques of the First World War. David French analyses the place of the army in British strategy in the interwar period and during the Second World War. He shows that after 1918 the General Staff tried hard to learn the lessons of the First World War, enthusiastically embracing technology as the best way of minimizing future casualties. In the first half of the Second World War the army did suffer from manifold weaknesses, not just in the form of shortages of equipment, but also in the way in which it applied its doctrine. Few soldiers were actively eager to close with the enemy, but the morale of the army never collapsed and its combat capability steadily improved from 1942 onwards. Professor French assesses Montgomery's contributions to the war effort and concludes that most important were his willingness to impose a uniform understanding of doctrine on his subordinates, and to use mechanized firepower in ways quite different from Haig in the First World War.
History

Red Coat, Green Machine

Author: Charles Kirke

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 971

How different were the men who fought at Blenheim and at Goose Green? Is there a human thread that connects the redcoat of 300 years ago with the British soldier of today? What would they find in common if they faced a common foe? This book is about the people in the Army, and the very human interactions between them in their daily lives. It marries the disciplines of Social Anthropology and Military History to provide a novel way of looking at the anatomy of the British Army at unit level from an entirely human perspective. Concentrating on the attitudes, expectations, and concerns expressed by the people involved, it sets out a set of simple models of life at regimental duty that can be used to describe, analyze and explain their behaviour over the past 300 years. The book is grounded on what soldiers of all ranks have said, using the author's research interview material for the modern witnesses, and memoirs, diaries, and letters (published and unpublished) for earlier ones.
Psychology

Shell Shock to PTSD

Author: Edgar Jones

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 320

View: 301

The application of psychiatry to war and terrorism is highly topical and a source of intense media interest. Shell Shock to PTSD explores the central issues involved in maintaining the mental health of the armed forces and treating those who succumb to the intense stress of combat. Drawing on historical records, recent findings and interviews with veterans and psychiatrists, Edgar Jones and Simon Wessely present a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of military psychiatry. The psychological disorders suffered by servicemen and women from 1900 to the present are discussed and related to contemporary medical priorities and health concerns. This book provides a thought-provoking evaluation of the history and practice of military psychiatry, and places its findings in the context of advancing medical knowledge and the developing technology of warfare. It will be of interest to practicing military psychiatrists and those studying psychiatry, military history, war studies or medical history.
History

The Storm of War

Author: Andrew Roberts

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 768

View: 634

On 2 August 1944, in the wake of the complete destruction of the German Army Group Centre in Belorussia, Winston Churchill mocked Adolf Hitler in the House of Commons by the rank he had reached in the First World War. 'Russian success has been somewhat aided by the strategy of Herr Hitler, of Corporal Hitler,' Churchill jibed. 'Even military idiots find it difficult not to see some faults in his actions.' Andrew Roberts's previous book Masters and Commanders studied the creation of Allied grand strategy; Beating Corporal Hitler now analyses how Axis strategy evolved. Examining the Second World War on every front, Roberts asks whether, with a different decision-making process and a different strategy, the Axis might even have won. Were those German generals who blamed everything on Hitler after the war correct, or were they merely scapegoating their former Führer once he was safely beyond defending himself? In researching this uniquely vivid history of the Second World War Roberts has walked many of the key battlefield and wartime sites of Russia, France, Italy, Germany and the Far East. The book is full of illuminating sidelights on the principle actors that bring their characters and the ways in which they reached decisions into fresh focus.
History

The Day Of Battle

Author: Rick Atkinson

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 816

View: 937

In An Army at Dawn - winner of the Pulitzer Prize - Rick Atkinson provided a dramatic and authoritative history of the Allied triumph in North Africa. Now, in The Day of the Battle, he follows the strengthening American and British armies as they invade Sicily in July 1943 and then, mile by bloody mile, fight their way north. The Italian campaign's outcome was never certain; in fact, Roosevelt, Churchill and their military advisors engaged in heated debate about whether an invasion of the so-called soft underbelly of Europe was even a good idea. But once underway, the commitment to liberate Italy from the Nazis never wavered, despite the agonizingly high price. The battles at Salerno, Anzio, and Monte Cassino were particularly difficult and lethal, yet as the months passed, the Allied forces continued to push the Germans up the Italian peninsula. And with the liberation of Rome in June 1944, ultimate victory at last began to seem inevitable. Drawing on an astonishing array of primary source material, written with great drama and flair, this is narrative history of the first rank.
History

Monte Cassino

Author: Matthew Parker

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 707

The six-month battle for Monte Cassino was Britain's bitterest and bloodiest encounter with the German army on any front in World War Two. At the beginning of 1944 Italy was the western Allies' only active front against Nazi-controlled Europe, and their only route to the capital was through the Liri valley. Towering over the entrance to the valley was the medieval monastery of Monte Cassino, a seemingly impenetrable fortress high up in the 'bleak and sinister' mountains. This was where the German commander, Kesselring, made his stand. MONTE CASSINO tells the extraordinary story of ordinary soldiers tested to the limits under conditions reminiscent of the bloodbaths of World War One. In a battle that became increasingly political, symbolic and personal as it progressed, more and more men were asked to throw themselves at the virtually impregnable German defences. It is a story of incompetence, hubris and politics redeemed at dreadful cost by the heroism of the soldiers.
History

Myths, Amnesia and Reality in Military Conflicts, 1935-1945

Author: Andrew Sangster

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 490

Stalin fabricated the myth that the Germans carried out the Katyń massacre and the West accepted it while always suspecting the reality. In the same way, each country tried to forget the more painful memories of its past and construct its own mythology. The Germans were never taken to task at Nuremberg for bombing because the Anglo-Americans virtually carried out a war of annihilation. The French Gaullist myth was that it was decadent politicians who caused the defeat, and that fighting France freed itself. In a similar vein, the Italian resistance was fostered as a myth and used postwar to cover the fascist period of their history. British and American popular history tends to portray their countries as the main victors often ignoring the massive Russian contribution, and generally concentrates on the barbarity of the Eastern war. Much is forgotten and much enhanced; both incidents and leaders. The Italian military historian of this book writes in depth about the Italian war so often ignored in western history, and tackles the myth of Italian cowardice, while the British author takes a cold, calculated look at Anglo-American leaders such as Montgomery, Mountbatten, Clark, Patton, and questions the myth of the special relationship between Great Britain and the USA, as well as the official and unofficial amnesia relating to self-inflicted gas wounds in Italy.
History

Public Schools and the Second World War

Author: David Walsh

Publisher: Pen and Sword Military

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 373

A historical analysis of the contribution of Great Britain’s public schools to the conduct of World War II. Following their ground-breaking book on Public Schools and the Great War, David Walsh and Anthony Seldon now examine how those same schools fared in the Second World War. They use eye-witness testimony to recount stories of resilience and improvisation in 1940 as the likelihood of invasion and the terrors of the Blitz threatened the very survival of public schools. They also assess the giant impact that public school alumni contributed to every aspect of the war effort. The authors examine how the “People’s War” brought social cohesion, with the opportunity to end public school exclusiveness to the fore, encouraged by Winston Churchill among others. That opportunity was ironically squandered by the otherwise radical Clement Attlee’s post-war Labour government, prolonging the “public school problem” right through to the present day. The public schools shaped twentieth century history profoundly, never more so than in the conduct of both its world wars. The impact of the schools on both wars was very different, as were the legacies. Drawing widely on primary source material and personal accounts of inspiring courage and endurance, this book is full of profound historical reflection and is essential reading for all who want to understand the history of modern Britain.
History

The War of the World

Author: Niall Ferguson

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 816

View: 719

The world at the beginning of the 20th century seemed for most of its inhabitants stable and relatively benign. Globalizing, booming economies married to technological breakthroughs seemed to promise a better world for most people. Instead, the 20th century proved to be overwhelmingly the most violent, frightening and brutalized in history with fanatical, often genocidal warfare engulfing most societies between the outbreak of the First World War and the end of the Cold War. What went wrong? How did we do this to ourselves? The War of the World comes up with compelling, fascinating answers. It is Niall Ferguson’s masterpiece.