History

The Rose and Irish Identity

Author: NK Harrington

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 148

View: 384

Both Ireland and the Pacific Northwest are known for their climates, and have historically been associated with the rose. This collection of essays explores the exchange Ireland has had with the Northwest using the rose as an example by examining the beautiful and the harsh, the petals and the thorns. It is the culmination of the work of established and emerging historians and writers who have traversed the boundary between the Northwest and Ireland several times. The timely contributions gathered here include essays about the imperialist mindset, biased court systems, the victims of social hatred, and organized resistance. Timeless themes include grief, poetry and the oral tradition, and the effect plants have upon a given population. The book is a much-needed contribution to often overlooked aspects of colonialism and boundaries.
History

Blackness and Transatlantic Irish Identity

Author: Lauren Onkey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 555

Blackness and Transatlantic Irish Identity analyzes the long history of imagined and real relationships between the Irish and African-Americans since the mid-nineteenth century in popular culture and literature. Irish writers and political activists have often claimed - and thereby created - a "black" identity to explain their experience with colonialism in Ireland and revere African-Americans as a source of spiritual and sexual vitality. Irish-Americans often resisted this identification so as to make a place for themselves in the U.S. However, their representation of an Irish-American identity pivots on a distinction between Irish-Americans and African-Americans. Lauren Onkey argues that one of the most consistent tropes in the assertion of Irish and Irish-American identity is constructed through or against African-Americans, and she maps that trope in the work of writers Roddy Doyle, James Farrell, Bernard MacLaverty, John Boyle O’Reilly, and Jimmy Breslin; playwright Ned Harrigan; political activists Bernadette Devlin and Tom Hayden; and musicians Van Morrison, U2, and Black 47.
History

Irish History Matters

Author: Brian M. Walker

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 113

WHILE knowledge of history can explain our contemporary situation, an awareness of the myths and misuses of our history can bring a broader and more conciliatory approach to current political and social challenges. History or, more correctly, ‘views of the past’ or ‘historical myths’ have shaped politics in both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. These views served in part to cause and sustain the ‘Troubles’. Eventually, many historical perceptions were challenged, which helped to promote the peace process. New ideas of revised and shared history were important. These changes are explored here. The public expression of history in Ireland through commemoration of important historical events and persons is investigated in a number of chapters. The impact of historical developments on identity is studied not just in Ireland, north and south, but also among the Irish diaspora, especially in America. In Irish History Matters, Brian M. Walker uses three decades of research to explore the effects historical events have had on Irish politics and society, and why they still have an important influence today.
Literary Criticism

The Poems of W. B. Yeats

Author: Peter McDonald

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 596

View: 750

In this multi-volume edition, the poetry of W.B. Yeats (1865–1939) is presented in full, with newly-established texts and detailed, wide-ranging commentary. Yeats began to write verse in the nineteenth century, and over time his own arrangements of poems repeatedly revised and rearranged both texts and canon. This edition of Yeats’s poetry presents all his verse, both published and unpublished, including a generous selection of textual variants from the many manuscript and printed sources. The edition also supplies the most extensive commentary on Yeats’s poetry to date, explaining specific references, and setting poems in their contexts; it also gives an account of the vast range of both literary and historical influences at work on the verse. The poems are presented in order of composition, and major revisions or rewritings of poems result in separate inclusions (in chronological sequence) for these writings as they were subsequently reconceived by the poet. In this second volume, the poems of Yeats’s early maturity emerge in the contexts of his engagement with Irish history and myth, along with nationalist politics; his increasing involvement with ritual magic and esoteric lore; and his turbulent, often unhappy, personal life. The poems of The Countess Kathleen and Various Legends and Lyrics (1892) reveal a poet of intense narrative power and metaphorical resource, adept at transforming miscellaneous sources into haunting and original poems. A major revision of his earlier narrative, ‘The Wanderings of Oisin’, takes place in this decade when Yeats is also taken up with the composition of elaborate and uncanny symbolic lyrics, many of them resulting from his love for Maud Gonne, that are finally collected in The Wind Among the Reeds (1899). This edition makes it possible to trace in detail Yeats’s debts to folklore and magic, alongside his involved and often difficult private and public life, in poetry of exceptional complexity and power.
Music

Music and Literary Modernism

Author: Robert P. McParland

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 224

View: 867

In Music and Literary Modernism, the intersections of music, literature and language are examined by an international group of scholars who engage in studies of modernist art and practice. The essays collected here present the significant place of music in the writing of T.S. Eliot, Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, James Weldon Johnson, Mina Loy, Stephen Mallarme, Ezra Pound, Marcel Proust, Gertrude Stein,Wallace Stevens and Virginia Woolf, as well as the importance of literary art for composers such as George Antheil, Pierre Boulez, Olivier Messaein, and The Beatles. Contributors explore the role of music and literary modernism in the postmodern sublime, sound and "music" in language, the uneasy alliance of jazz and pop song in high modernist work, the Beatles as modernists, and other topics. This is a revised and updated second edition.
Music

Music and Irish Identity

Author: Gerry Smyth

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 178

View: 874

Music and Irish Identity represents the latest stage in a life-long project for Gerry Smyth, focusing here on the ways in which music engages with particular aspects of Irish identity. The nature of popular music and the Irish identity it supposedly articulates have both undergone profound change in recent years: the first as a result of technological and wider industrial changes in the organisation and dissemination of music as seen, for example, with digital platforms such as YouTube, Spotify and iTunes. A second factor has been Ireland’s spectacular fall from economic grace after the demise of the "Celtic Tiger", and the ensuing crisis of national identity. Smyth argues that if, as the stereotypical association would have it, the Irish have always been a musical race, then that association needs re-examination in the light of developments in relation to both cultural practice and political identity. This book contributes to that process through a series of related case studies that are both scholarly and accessible. Some of the principal ideas broached in the text include the (re-)establishment of music as a key object of Irish cultural studies; the theoretical limitations of traditional musicology; the development of new methodologies specifically designed to address the demands of Irish music in all its aspects; and the impact of economic austerity on musical negotiations of Irish identity. The book will be of seminal importance to all those interested in popular music, cultural studies and the wider fate of Ireland in the twenty-first century.
Performing Arts

Crossroads: Performance Studies and Irish Culture

Author: Sara Brady

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 255

View: 751

The highly performative categories of 'Irish culture' and 'Irishness' are in need of critical address, prompted by recent changes in Irish society, the arts industry and modes of critical inquiry. This book broaches this task by considering Irish expressive culture through some of the paradigms and vocabularies offered by performance studies.
Performing Arts

Experimental Irish Theatre

Author: I. Walsh

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 202

View: 887

This book examines experimental Irish theatre that ran counter to the naturalistic 'peasant' drama synonymous with Irish playwriting. Focusing on four marginalised playwrights after Yeats, it charts a tradition linking the experimentation of the early Irish theatre movement with the innovation of contemporary Irish and international drama.
Literary Criticism

The Twentieth Century in Poetry

Author: Peter Childs

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 186

Until now, most teaching has focused on the novel as the most useful way of raising issues of gender, ethnicity, theory, nationality, politics and social class. In The Twentieth Century in Poetry Peter Childs places literature in a wider social context and demonstrates that all poetry is historically produced and consumed and is part of our understanding of society and identity. This student-friendly critical survey includes chapters on: * the Georgians * First World War poetry * Eliot * Yeats * the thirties * post-war poetry * contemporary anthologies * women's poetry * Northern Irish and black British poets It builds a narrative not of poetry in the twentieth century, but of the twentieth century in poetry.
Business & Economics

Shopping for Identity

Author: Marilyn Halter

Publisher: Schocken

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 99

In America today, you can connect to your ethnic heritage in dozens of ways, or adopt an identity just for an evening. Our society is not a melting pot but a salad bar--a bazaar in which the purveyors of goods and services spend close to $2 billion a year marketing the foods, clothing, objects, vacations, and events that help people express their (and others') ethnic identities. This is a huge business, whose target groups are the "hyphenated Americans"--in other words, all of us. As immigrant groups gain economic security, they tend to reinforce--not relinquish--their ethnic identification. Marilyn Halter demonstrates that, to a great extent, they do it by shopping. And their purchasing power is enormous. How has the marketplace responded to this hunger? Instantly and wholeheartedly: tweaking old products and inventing new ones; launching new brands in supermarkets, new music groups, vacation itineraries, language courses, toys, greeting cards, et cetera. This nexus of business and ethnicity is already seen as the hottest consumer development of this decade, and Halter is uniquely qualified to describe its origins, the exponential growth of products and advertising, and the phenomenal sales of items from salsa to Chieftains CDs. She addresses her subject with an abundance of anecdotal evidence, telling examples of ethnic marketing, and interviews with entrepreneurs (many of them immigrants) who are vigorously seizing the opportunities offered by the business of ethnicity. Shopping for Identity is provocative, intriguing, and farseeing, illuminating an important aspect of our contemporary way of life while validating the yearning we all feel for connection to our roots.
Literary Criticism

The Secret Rose

Author: Norman A. Jeffares

Publisher: Roberts Rinehart

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 156

View: 208

Arranged in chronological sequence, The Secret Rose offers a glimpse of all Yeats' styles-beginning with his youthful romantic idealism and ending with his more outspoken, sardonic treatment of sexuality.
History

The Global Dimensions of Irish Identity

Author: Cian T. McMahon

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 395

Though Ireland is a relatively small island on the northeastern fringe of the Atlantic, 70 million people worldwide--including some 45 million in the United States--claim it as their ancestral home. In this wide-ranging, ambitious book, Cian T. McMahon explores the nineteenth-century roots of this transnational identity. Between 1840 and 1880, 4.5 million people left Ireland to start new lives abroad. Using primary sources from Ireland, Australia, and the United States, McMahon demonstrates how this exodus shaped a distinctive sense of nationalism. By doggedly remaining loyal to both their old and new homes, he argues, the Irish helped broaden the modern parameters of citizenship and identity. From insurrection in Ireland to exile in Australia to military service during the American Civil War, McMahon's narrative revolves around a group of rebels known as Young Ireland. They and their fellow Irish used weekly newspapers to construct and express an international identity tailored to the fluctuating world in which they found themselves. Understanding their experience sheds light on our contemporary debates over immigration, race, and globalization.
Literary Criticism

Language, Identity and Liberation in Contemporary Irish Literature

Author: J. Keating-Miller

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 190

View: 433

Ireland's history of contested language systems has always been linked to its political realities; Language, Identity and Liberation attends to a movement of contemporary Irish writing that considers the significance of the region's tumultuous cultural, social and political history in portrayals of contemporary Ireland's everyday life and speech.
Literary Criticism

National Identities and Imperfections in Contemporary Irish Literature

Author: Luz Mar González-Arias

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 177

This book is about the role that the imperfect, the disquieting and the dystopian are currently playing in the construction of Irish identities. All the essays assess identity issues that require urgent examination, problematize canonical definitions of Irishness and, above all, look at the ways in which the artistic output of the country has been altered by the Celtic Tiger phenomenon and its subsequent demise. Recent narrative from Ireland, principally published in the twenty-first century and/or at the end of the 1990s, is dealt with extensively. The authors examined include Eavan Boland, Mary Rose Callaghan, Peter Cunningham, Emma Donoghue, Anne Enright, Emer Martin, Lia Mills, Paul Muldoon, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, Bernard O’Donoghue, Peter Sirr and David Wheatley.
Literary Criticism

Yeats and the Drama of Sacred Space

Author: Nicholas Meihuizen

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 190

View: 731

In recent years Yeats scholarship has been, to a large extent, historically-based in emphasis. Much has been gained from this emphasis, if we consider the refinement of critical awareness resulting from a better understanding of the intricate relationship between the poet and his times. However, the present author feels that an exclusive adherence to this approach impacts negatively on our ability to appreciate and understand Yeatsian creativity from within the internally located imperatives of creativity itself, as opposed to our understanding it on the basis of aesthetically constitutive socio-historical forces operative from without. He feels a need to relocate the study of Yeats in the work and thought of the poet himself, to focus again on the poet's own myth-making. To this end Nicholas Meihuizen examines this myth-making as it relates to certain archetypal figures, places, and structures. The figures in question are the antagonist and goddess, embodiments of conflict and feminine forces in Yeats, and they participate in a lively drama within the places and shapes considered sacred by the poet: places such as the Sligo district and Byzantium; shapes such as the circling gyres of his system. The book should be interesting and valuable to students and scholars of varying degrees of acquaintance with the poet. To long-time Yeatsians it offers fresh perspectives onto important works and preoccupations. To new students it offers a means of exploring wide-ranging material within a few central, interrelated frames, a means that mirrors Yeats's own commitment to unity in diversity.
History

Rule Britannia: Nationalism, Identity and the Modern Olympic Games

Author: Matthew P. Llewellyn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 214

View: 763

On 6 July 2005, the International Olympic Committee awarded the 2012 summer Olympic Games to the city of London, opening a new chapter in Great Britain’s rich Olympic history. Despite the prospect of hosting the summer Games for the third time since Pierre de Coubertin’s 1894 revival of the Olympic movement, the historical roots of British Olympism have received limited scholarly attention. With the conclusion of the 2008 Beijing Olympics and the passing of the baton to London, Rule Britannia remedies that oversight. This book uncovers Britain’s early Olympic involvement, revealing how the British public, media, and leading governmental officials were strongly opposed to international Olympic competition. It explores how the British Olympic Association focused on three main factors in the midst of widespread national opposition: it embraced early Olympian spectacles as a platform for maintaining a sporting union with Ireland, it fostered a greater sense of imperial identity with Britain’s white dominions, and it undertook an ambitious policy of athletic specialization designed to reverse the nation’s waning fortunes in international sport. This book was previously published as a special issue of International Journal of the History of Sport.
Biography & Autobiography

The Day That Changed My Life

Author: Caitlin McBride

Publisher: Black & White Publishing Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 351

Stories to inspire. Stories to connect. Extraordinary moments in which women's lives changed forever. Exhilarating, heartbreaking and ultimately inspiring, The Day That Changed My Life is a remarkable collection of stories of Ireland's women and the extraordinary moments which transformed their lives. There are stories of the marvels of motherhood and coming out, leaps of faith and determined entrepreneurship. Stories of crazy highs, such as Oscar nominations and being elected into office. And stories of brave fights against illness and triumphs against all odds. All are united by a strength in adversity, courage and resilience, and an ability to find humour in the darkest places. Our lives change, but some days change our lives forever. 'These women's stories have inspired me beyond measure and I remain in awe of their unwavering honesty. They leave me entirely humbled, while simultaneously stoking a fire in my belly.' CAITLIN McBRIDE Featuring inspirational Stories from: ÁINE KERR, AMY HUBERMAN, ANDREA NOLAN, BREEGE O'DONOGHUE, CAROLINE DOWNEY, CASSIE STOKES, CHRISTINA NOBLE, CIARA GRIFFIN, DERVAL O'ROURKE, DOIREANN GARRIHY, EIMEAR VARIAN BARRY, ELLEN O'MALLEY DUNLOP, EMMA DONOGHUE, EVANNE NÍ CHUILINN, GEORGIE CRAWFORD, HELEN McENTEE, JOANNE BYRNE, JUDITH GILLESPIE, KIRSTEN MATE MAHER, KATHERINE ZAPPONE, KATHY RYAN, LOUISE O'REILLY, MARY ANN O’BRIEN, NORAH CASEY, NORAH PATTEN, ORLA BARRY, SABINA BRENNAN, SARAH TOBIN, SONYA LENNON, TARA FLYNN, TERRY PRONE
Political Science

Lyric Poetry and Modern Politics

Author: Clare Cavanagh

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 332

View: 885

This work explores the intersection of poetry, national life, and national identity in Poland and Russia, from 1917 to the present. It also provides a comparative study of modern poetry from the perspective of the Eastern and Western sides of the Iron Curtain.
Political Science

The Oxford Handbook of British Politics

Author: Matthew Flinders

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 1008

View: 499

The study of British politics has been reinvigorated in recent years as a generation of new scholars seeks to build-upon a distinct disciplinary heritage while also exploring new empirical territory and finds much support and encouragement from previous generations in forging new grounds in relation to theory and methods. It is in this context that The Oxford Handbook of British Politics has been conceived. The central ambition of the Handbook is not just to illustrate both the breadth and depth of scholarship that is to be found within the field. It also seeks to demonstrate the vibrancy and critical self-reflection that has cultivated a much sharper and engaging, and notably less insular, approach to the terrain it seeks to explore and understand. In this emphasis on critical engagement, disciplinary evolution, and a commitment to shaping rather than re-stating the discipline The Oxford Handbook of British Politics is consciously distinctive. In showcasing the diversity now found in the analysis of British politics, the Handbook is built upon three foundations. The first principle that underpins the volume is a broad understanding of 'the political'. It covers a much broader range of topics, themes and issues than would commonly be found within a book on British politics. This emphasis on an inclusive approach also characterises the second principle that has shaped this collection - namely, diversity in relation to commissioned authors. The final principle focuses on the distinctiveness of the study of British politics. Each chapter seeks to reflect on what is distinctive- both in terms of the empirical nature of the issue of concern, and the theories and methods that have been deployed to unravel the nature and causes of the debate. The result is a unique volume that: draws-upon the intellectual strengths of the study of British politics; reflects the innate diversity and inclusiveness of the discipline; isolates certain distinctive issues and then reflects on their broader international relevance; and finally looks to the future by pointing towards emerging or overlooked areas of research.