History

America in the Seventies

Author: Professor of American Studies and Regents Lecturer Beth Bailey

Publisher: Culture America (Paperback)

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 513

The seventies witnessed economic decline in America, coupled with a series of foreign policy failures, events that created an air of unease and uncertainty. This volume examines the ways in which Americans responded to a changing world and sought to redefine themselves.
History

The Seventies in America

Author: John C. Super

Publisher: Salem PressInc

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 1107

View: 489

Entries describe the decade's events, musical groups and performers, authors, political groups, movies, and literature, each assessing the topic's impact and tracing subsequent events.
History

America in the Seventies

Author: Stephanie Slocum-Schaffer

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 578

In revisiting this period of American history, Stephanie A. Slocum-Schaffer plunges readers into the tumultuous seventies. Through her vivid descriptions of the most important events, she offers a visceral sense of the decade, while placing those events in the context of a wide-ranging survey of the political, social, and cultural shifts shaping those years. Central to the book is her contention that the 1970s were a time of betrayal and loss for the United States, tempered by moments of healing and renewal. The author evokes the pain of Nixon's betrayal of the nation, the revelations of the My Lai massacre and the Pentagon Papers, and the losses, notably of such icons as John Wayne and Jimi Hendrix, but also of the doomed cult followers at Jonestown. At the same time, she recalls the success of Camp David, the triumphs of Billie Jean King and Frank Robinson, and the first Space Shuttle test flight, and reminds us of the healing that such evets offered to the United State's faltering self-esteem. This inaugural volume in the series, America in the Twentieth Century, is an accessible and energetic exploration of the times and will serve as a standard introductory survey to history courses. --
American Life

How the Seventies Changed America

Author: Nicholas Lemann

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: American Life

Page: 11

View: 212

The "loser decade" that at first seemed nothing more than a breathing space between the high drama of the 1960s and whatever was coming next is beginning to reveal itself as a bigger time than we thought.
History

The Seventies

Author: Bruce J. Schulman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 856

Most of us think of the 1970s as an "in-between" decade, the uninspiring years that happened to fall between the excitement of the 1960s and the Reagan Revolution. A kitschy period summed up as the "Me Decade," it was the time of Watergate and the end of Vietnam, of malaise and gas lines, but of nothing revolutionary, nothing with long-lasting significance. In the first full history of the period, Bruce Schulman, a rising young cultural and political historian, sweeps away misconception after misconception about the 1970s. In a fast-paced, wide-ranging, and brilliant reexamination of the decade's politics, culture, and social and religious upheaval, he argues that the Seventies were one of the most important of the postwar twentieth-century decades. The Seventies witnessed a profound shift in the balance of power in American politics, economics, and culture, all driven by the vast growth of the Sunbelt. Country music, a southern silent majority, a boom in "enthusiastic" religion, and southern California New Age movements were just a few of the products of the new demographics. Others were even more profound: among them, public life as we knew it died a swift death. The Seventies offers a masterly reconstruction of high and low culture, of public events and private lives, of Jonathan Livingston Seagull, Evel Knievel, est, Nixon, Carter, and Reagan. From The Godfather and Network to the Ramones and Jimmy Buffett; from Billie jean King and Bobby Riggs to Phyllis Schlafly and NOW; from Proposition 13 to the Energy Crisis; here are all the names, faces, and movements that once filled our airwaves, and now live again. The Seventies is powerfully argued, compulsively readable, and deeply provocative.
History

The Seventies

Author: Bruce Schulman

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 949

Sweeping away misconceptions about the "Me Decade," Bruce Schulman offers a fast-paced, wide-ranging, and brilliant examination of the political, cultural, social, and religious upheavals of the 1970s. Arguing that it was one of the most important of the postwar twentieth-century decades, despite its reputation as an eminently forgettable period, Schulman reconstructs public events and private lives, high culture and low, analyzing not only presidential politics and national policy but also the broader social and cultural experiences that transformed American life. Here are the names, faces, and movements that gave birth to the world we now live in-from Nixon and Carter to The Godfather and the Ramones; from Billie Jean King and Phyllis Schlafly to NOW and the ERA; from the Energy Crisis to Roe v. Wade. The Seventies is an astutely provocative reexamination of a misunderstood era.
Biography & Autobiography

A Chronicle of Wasted Time

Author: Frederick R. Karl

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 556

View: 806

A Chronicle of Wasted Time is a cultural history of the 1970s in America. It presupposes that the Seventies had a distinct character, although it cannot be so sharply defined as the Sixties or Eighties. A book on the Seventies joins almost innumerable unresolved elements, and what troubled that decade continues to trouble us. The difficult part is that these troubling elements do not connect, so that a continuous narrative is often impossible to maintain. Yet there was something like a "culture" of the Seventies, however disconnected the parts. That culture is the theme of the book.
Social Science

American Culture in the 1970s

Author: Will Kaufman

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 547

The 1970s was one of the most culturally vibrant periods in American history. This book discusses the dominant cultural forms of the 1970s - fiction and poetry; television and drama; film and visual culture; popular music and style; public space and spectacle - and the decade's most influential practitioners and texts: from Toni Morrison to All in the Family, from Diane Arbus to Bruce Springsteen, from M.A.S.H. to Taxi Driver and from disco divas to Vietnam protesters. In response to those who consider the seventies the time of disco, polyester and narcissism, this book rewrites the critical engagement with one of America's most misunderstood decades.Key Features*Focused case studies featuring key texts and influential writers, artists, directors and musicians*Chronology of 1970s American Culture*Bibliographies for each chapter and a general bibliography on 1970s Culture*14 black-and-white illustrations
Nineteen seventies

The Seventies in America: Room 222-Zodiac killer

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Nineteen seventies

Page: 1107

View: 742

Watergate, the Vietnam War, the environmental movement, the energy crisis, the women's movement, disco. The Seventies in America brings this decade to life by examining these topics and many more.
Abortion

A Private Choice

Author: John Thomas Noonan

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Abortion

Page: 244

View: 308

Nineteen seventies

The Seventies in America: Football-Roller skating

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Nineteen seventies

Page: 1107

View: 112

Watergate, the Vietnam War, the environmental movement, the energy crisis, the women's movement, disco. The Seventies in America brings this decade to life by examining these topics and many more.
International relations

The Endless Crisis: America in the Seventies

Author: International Association for Cultural Freedom

Publisher: New York : Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: International relations

Page: 310

View: 598

United States

America in the Seventies

Author: Norman J. Ornstein

Publisher: Boston : Little, Brown

ISBN:

Category: United States

Page: 332

View: 378

International relations

The Endless Crisis: America in the Seventies

Author: International Association for Cultural Freedom

Publisher: New York : Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: International relations

Page: 310

View: 483

African Americans

A Freedomways Reader

Author: Ernest Kaiser

Publisher: Publications International

ISBN:

Category: African Americans

Page: 432

View: 366

Nineteen seventies

How We Got Here : the 70's, the Decade that Brought You Modern Life (for Better Or Worse)

Author: David Frum

Publisher: Vintage Canada

ISBN:

Category: Nineteen seventies

Page: 448

View: 159

A Rip van Winkle who nodded off in the 1940s and woke up today would be astonished by middle-aged men going to work in khaki pants and baseball caps, millions of children in daycare, and the crumbling of the mainline Protestant churches. If asked when and how these changes came about, most people would probably point to the 1960s. But David Frum argues that it was the supposedly quiescent 1970s that created modern America, and altered the American personality forever. The decade left behind a country that was less self-confident, less literate, less polite, less economically equal, more competitive, more expressive and more sexual. Frum examines this metamorphosis through political events, popular opinion polls, films, music, advertising and more to describe the most total social transformation the United States has lived through since the coming age of industrialism.
Performing Arts

Hollywood's Last Golden Age

Author: Jonathan Kirshner

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 280

View: 583

Between 1967 and 1976 a number of extraordinary factors converged to produce an uncommonly adventurous era in the history of American film. The end of censorship, the decline of the studio system, economic changes in the industry, and demographic shifts among audiences, filmmakers, and critics created an unprecedented opportunity for a new type of Hollywood movie, one that Jonathan Kirshner identifies as the "seventies film." In Hollywood’s Last Golden Age, Kirshner shows the ways in which key films from this period—including Chinatown, Five Easy Pieces, The Graduate, and Nashville, as well as underappreciated films such as The Friends of Eddie Coyle, Klute, and Night Moves—were important works of art in continuous dialogue with the political, social, personal, and philosophical issues of their times. These "seventies films" reflected the era’s social and political upheavals: the civil rights movement, the domestic consequences of the Vietnam war, the sexual revolution, women’s liberation, the end of the long postwar economic boom, the Shakespearean saga of the Nixon Administration and Watergate. Hollywood films, in this brief, exceptional moment, embraced a new aesthetic and a new approach to storytelling, creating self-consciously gritty, character-driven explorations of moral and narrative ambiguity. Although the rise of the blockbuster in the second half of the 1970s largely ended Hollywood’s embrace of more challenging films, Kirshner argues that seventies filmmakers showed that it was possible to combine commercial entertainment with serious explorations of politics, society, and characters’ interior lives.