Fiction

The Sinkings

Author: Amanda Curtin

Publisher: UWA Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 300

View: 183

In 1882 human remains were discovered at the Sinkings, a lonely campsite near Albany, Western Australia. The surgeon conducting the autopsy claimed they were those of a woman. Why, then, was the victim later identified as Little Jock, a former convict? And why was the murder so brutal, so gruesome? More than a hundred years later, Willa Samson embarks on a long and lonely search to find out. The Sinkings is a story within a story, the tragic historical account of Little Jock’s life embedded within a contemporary narrative of a mother’s guilt and grief. Beautifully crafted, the novel deals with the dilemma confronting parents of an intersexed child and the issue of gender. While a work of fiction, the discovery of Little Jock’s remains and the controversy surrounding their identification are actual events.
History

Wilful Murder: The Sinking Of The Lusitania

Author: Diana Preston

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 380

On May 7th, 1915 a passenger ship crossing the Atlantic sank with the loss of 1200 lives. On board were some world-famous figures, including multimillionaire Alfred Vanderbilt. But this wasn't the Titanic and there was no iceberg. The liner was the Lusitania and it was torpedoed by a German U-boat. Wilful Murder is the hugely compelling story of the sinking of the Lusitania. The first book to look at the events in their full historical context, it is also the first to place the human dimension at its heart. Using first-hand accounts of the tragedy Diana Preston brings the characters to life, recreating the splendour of the liner as it set sail and the horror of its final moments. Using British, American and German research material she answers many of the unanswered and controversial questions surrounding the Lusitania: why didn't Cunard listen to warnings that the ship would be a target of the Germans? Was the Lusitania sacrificed to bring the Americans into the War? What was really in the Lusitania's hold? Was she armed? Had Cunard's offices been infiltrated by German agents? And did the Kaiser's decision to cease unrestricted U-boat warfare in response to international outrage expressed after the sinking effectively change the outcome of the First World War? Highly readable, highly researched Wilful Murder casts dramatic new light on one of the world's most famous maritime disasters.
History

The Sinking of the Prince of Wales & Repulse

Author: Patrick Mahoney

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 366

View: 481

On the third day of the war with Japan, two Royal Navy capital ships were sunk off Malaya by air torpedo attack. They had not requested the air support that could have saved them and 840 men died in the battleship HMS Prince of Wales and the battle cruiser HMS Repulse. The authors re-create for the reader not only what happened, but also what it was like for the men involved. They dispose of several myths to explain the events of those confused hours, and address the uncertainty, controversy and strong emotions that surrounded the militarily disastrous sinkings.
Shipwrecks

The Sinking of the Titanic

Author: L. Marmaduke Collins

Publisher: Breakwater Books

ISBN:

Category: Shipwrecks

Page: 196

View: 445

Few human events have stirred the imagination, inspired myths and movies and had such a hold upon the weste world as the sinking of the unsinkable ship, the RMS Titanic. In his convincing analysis of the facts and evidence, experienced ice-pilot Captain Marmaduke Collins comes up with an intriguing new interpretation of what happened on the Titanic's fateful night.
Transportation

The Sinking of RMS Tayleur

Author: Gill Hoffs

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 160

View: 236

The moment they fell into the water the waves caught them and dashed them violently against the rocks, and the survivors on shore could perceive the unfortunate creatures...struggling amidst the waves, and one by one sinking under them.' (Hereford Times, 28 January 1854) ??The wrecking of the RMS Tayleur made headlines nearly 60 years before the Titanic. Both were run by the White Star Line, both were heralded as the most splendid ships of their time – and both sank in tragic circumstances on their maiden voyages. ??On 19 January 1854 the Tayleur, a large merchant vessel, left Liverpool for Australia; packed with hopeful emigrants, her hold stuffed with cargo. On the 160th anniversary of the disaster, Gill Hoffs reveals new theories behind the disaster and tells the stories of the passengers and crew on the ill-fated vessel: ??Captain John Noble, record breaking hero of the Gold Rush era. ??Ship surgeon Robert Hannay Cunningham and his young family, on their way to a new life among the prospectors of Tent City. ??Samuel Carby, ex-convict, returning to the gold fields with his new wife – and a fortune sewn into her corsets. ??But the ship's revolutionary iron hull prevented its compasses from working. Lost in the Irish Sea, a storm swept the Tayleur and the 650 people aboard towards a cliff, studded with rocks 'black as death'. What happened next shocked the world.??As featured in the Daily Mail, Yorkshire Post, Manchester Evening News, Hereford Times, Liverpool Echo, The Press & Journal, Dundee Courier, Fife Herald, Discover Your History, Your Family Tree, the Warrington Guardian and on BBC Radio Manchester, BBC Radio Merseyside, RTE Radio, Radio Warrington, Kingdom FM.
Juvenile Nonfiction

The Sinking of the Titanic

Author: Jim Whiting

Publisher: Mitchell Lane Publishers, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 48

View: 366

The sinking of the ocean liner Titanic in 1912 was one of the most famous events of the twentieth century. The ship was the largest and most luxurious passenger liner of the age. While she was being built, Titanic was described as “practically unsinkable.” Yet she went down on her maiden voyage after striking an iceberg. More than 1,500 passengers and crew members perished in the frigid waters of the North Atlantic. Nearly all died because the ship didn’t carry enough lifeboats. Yet according to the shipping regulations at the time, Titanic actually carried more lifeboats than she was legally required to. Many people also believe that the ship was traveling too fast. Yet her captain wasn’t doing anything different than nearly every other liner at that time. The sinking attracted worldwide media interest. This interest has never lessened. The loss of the Titanic is just as fascinating today as it was on the day it occurred.
Transportation

The Sinking of the Titanic

Author: Logan Marshall

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 300

View: 411

When she set sail from Southampton on her maiden voyage to New York on 10 April 1912, RMS Titanic, the pride of the White Star fleet, was the largest ocean liner in the world. Deemed 'practically unsinkable' because of her double-bottomed hull and watertight compartments, she carried over 2,000 passengers and crew, although only sufficient lifeboats for just over half that number. Four days out of Southampton, on the night of 14 April, she struck an iceberg in the North Atlantic and sank within a matter of hours; around 1,500 lives were lost. Logan Marshall interviewed the survivors in the immediate aftermath of the disaster and in this book he recorded the facts as they were known. Well established as part of the canon of Titanic literature, this book is a must-have for anyone with an interest in the ship and her sorrowful fate.
Business & Economics

Freefall: America, Free Markets, and the Sinking of the World Economy

Author: Joseph E. Stiglitz

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 320

View: 258

An incisive look at the global economic crisis, our flawed response, and the implications for the world’s future prosperity. The Great Recession, as it has come to be called, has impacted more people worldwide than any crisis since the Great Depression. Flawed government policy and unscrupulous personal and corporate behavior in the United States created the current financial meltdown, which was exported across the globe with devastating consequences. The crisis has sparked an essential debate about America’s economic missteps, the soundness of this country’s economy, and even the appropriate shape of a capitalist system. Few are more qualified to comment during this turbulent time than Joseph E. Stiglitz. Winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Economics, Stiglitz is “an insanely great economist, in ways you can’t really appreciate unless you’re deep into the field” (Paul Krugman, New York Times). In Freefall, Stiglitz traces the origins of the Great Recession, eschewing easy answers and demolishing the contention that America needs more billion-dollar bailouts and free passes to those “too big to fail,” while also outlining the alternatives and revealing that even now there are choices ahead that can make a difference. The system is broken, and we can only fix it by examining the underlying theories that have led us into this new “bubble capitalism.” Ranging across a host of topics that bear on the crisis, Stiglitz argues convincingly for a restoration of the balance between government and markets. America as a nation faces huge challenges—in health care, energy, the environment, education, and manufacturing—and Stiglitz penetratingly addresses each in light of the newly emerging global economic order. An ongoing war of ideas over the most effective type of capitalist system, as well as a rebalancing of global economic power, is shaping that order. The battle may finally give the lie to theories of a “rational” market or to the view that America’s global economic dominance is inevitable and unassailable. For anyone watching with indignation while a reckless Wall Street destroyed homes, educations, and jobs; while the government took half-steps hoping for a “just-enough” recovery; and while bankers fell all over themselves claiming not to have seen what was coming, then sought government bailouts while resisting regulation that would make future crises less likely, Freefall offers a clear accounting of why so many Americans feel disillusioned today and how we can realize a prosperous economy and a moral society for the future.
History

The Sinking of the USS Cairo

Author: John C. Wideman

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 139

View: 532

In 1862, in one of the South's most amazing secret operations, a Confederate team, using newly invented explosive mines, blew up the USS Cairo, one of the Union's most feared ironclad gunboats. It sank within minutes. The USS Cairo is the only remaining vessel from the Union navy's river fleet. For 102 years, the ironclad rested deep in the mud of the Yazoo River. In 1964 it was rediscovered and salvaged. Now the USS Cairo is one of the premier exhibits at the Vicksburg National Military Park. This historic vessel, its entire cargo of weapons and personal effects, and its role in the war continue to spark the imagination of Civil War buffs and thousands of tourists. Here, for the first time, in a carefully documented study is the entire story of the Confederate Secret Service team that sank the USS Cairo. With family oral histories never before consulted and with newly examined documents from the National Archives, The Sinking of the USS Cairo disproves some previous theories and corrects factual errors found in earlier reports. It shows conclusively that the Cairo was not sunk by an electrically detonated mine but by a different method. Also, it identifies the members of the Confederate crew, whose names supposedly were lost to history. For the first time in a book about this river war, there are illustrations of all five gunboats that were engaged in this action. Told from the Confederate perspective for the first time, this refocused story of the Cairo is a significant addition to the history of the Confederate Secret Service, to the history of the operations around Vicksburg, and to the history of the war on the western frontier.
Juvenile Nonfiction

The Sinking of the Lusitania

Author: Steven Otfinoski

Publisher: Capstone

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 112

View: 365

"Describes the sinking of the Lusitania. Readers' choices reveal various historical details"--