Social Science

The Social Order of the Slum

Author: Gerald D. Suttles

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 266

View: 892

While he did the research for this book, Gerald Suttles lived for almost three years in the high-delinquency area around Hull House on Chicago's New West Side. He came to know it intimately and was welcomed by its residents, who are Italian, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Negro. Suttles contends that the residents of a slum neighborhood have a set of standards for behavior that take precedence over the more widely held "moral standards" of "straight" society. These standards arise out of the specific experience of each locality, are peculiar to it, and largely determine how the neighborhood people act. One of the tasks of urban sociology, according to Suttles, is to explore why and how slum communities provide their inhabitants with these local norms. The Social Order of the Slum is the record of such an exploration, and it defines theoretical principles and concepts that will aid in subsequent research.
History

The Social Order of a Frontier Community

Author: Don Harrison Doyle

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 324

View: 171

''A well-conceived and well-argued book that is essential reading for those interested in the study of community building.'' -- Journal of American History ''This study is important for both frontier and urban historians. It is well written, thoroughly documented, and illustrated in an informative manner. One may hope that future studies of other nineteenth century American towns will be completed with the competence and style of this excellent volume.'' -- The Old Northwest ''For one who has lived in Jacksonville as I have, reading this book stirred fond memories and answered lingering questions about this town. . . . As a capsule study of an unusual Illinois community renowned for its past, Doyle's book makes for fascinating reading.'' -- Civil War History
Social Science

Cities, Classes, and the Social Order

Author: Anthony Leeds

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 637

Cities, Classes, and the Social Order brings together nine conceptual and theoretical essays by the anthropologist, Anthony Leeds (1925–1989), whose pioneering work in the anthropology of complex societies was built on formative personal and research experiences in both urban and rural settings in the United States, Brazil, Venezuela, and Portugal. Leeds brought to his anthropology a simultaneous concern for science and humanism, and for explanation and interpretation. He constructed a nuanced and intricate vision of the connections among ecology, technology, history, evolution, structure, process, power, culture, social organization, and human creativity. The essays in this book draw on his approach to demarcate the role of cities in human history, the use and abuse of class analysis, the bases of power in complex societies, and an agenda for ethnographic and social-historical research in the contemporary world. In addition to major but little-known writings and an important essay on Marx here published for the first time in English, a selection of Leeds's ethnographically and politically inspired poems are included, as are several of his professionally exhibited photographs. In addition, introductory essays by R. Timothy Sieber and Roger Sanjek chart the course of Leeds's career and the development of his theoretical viewpoint.
Emigration and immigration

Mobilitäten

Author: Reinhard Johler

Publisher: Waxmann Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Emigration and immigration

Page: 596

View: 403

Religion

The Foundations of Social Order

Author: R. J. Rushdoony

Publisher: Chalcedon Foundation

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 233

View: 354

"The Foundations of Social Order was, and remains, the most unique book ever written in the history of Christendom. Nothing like it has been written before, and nothing like it has been written since. Christian and non-Christian historians have generally agreed on at least one thing about creeds and history: they are not connected in any meaningful, comprehensive way. A few non-Christian historians-Harold Berman and his Law and Revolution being a good example-have mentioned that the Christian creeds have been instrumental in shaping the legal views and therefore the legal structure of the West. But a general study of how the creeds formed the West and its unique outlook has always been lacking; the reason being that both Christian and non-Christian authors are eager to constrain the significance of the creeds to the church and the history of theology. Even Philip Schaff in his three-volume work, The Creeds of Christendom, confines their value and use to the church. The view of the creeds has been dualistic; creeds were separated from history, and history was left to follow its own course, independent from the development of Christian theology and the perfection of the faith of the saints.
Biography & Autobiography

A Journey Through Social Change

Author: Gerald D. Suttles

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page:

View: 989

In this memoir, renowned urban sociologist Gerald D. Suttles examines his own life with the same insights that produced The Social Order of the Slum, The Man-Made City, and Front Page Economics. Having understood so much about different kinds of people, Suttles knew he couldn’t write about himself without writing about the worlds that made him. So he wrote what he called an ethnoautobiography or ethnography. Those who know his work will recognize some familiar themes: social control, cognitive maps, ordered segmentation, contrived communities, and so on. But in the foreground of it all is Gerry himself, a bright kid in the hills of Western North Carolina, a tough sailor on the U.S.S. Essex, a veteran looking for a way forward in civilian life, and finally a bright young sociologist on the brink of a distinguished career. In A Journey Through Social Change, Suttles shares how he thought of his entire life as a series of accidents, most of which turned out to be — as he put it — “dumb luck.” But it’s what you make of accidents that matters. And Gerry Suttles made the most of every one of them.
Social Science

Organized Crime in Chicago

Author: Robert M. Lombardo

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 589

This book provides a comprehensive sociological explanation for the emergence and continuation of organized crime in Chicago. Tracing the roots of political corruption that afforded protection to gambling, prostitution, and other vice activity in Chicago and other large American cities, Robert M. Lombardo challenges the dominant belief that organized crime in America descended directly from the Sicilian Mafia. According to this widespread "alien conspiracy" theory, organized crime evolved in a linear fashion beginning with the Mafia in Sicily, emerging in the form of the Black Hand in America's immigrant colonies, and culminating in the development of the Cosa Nostra in America's urban centers. Looking beyond this Mafia paradigm, this volume argues that the development of organized crime in Chicago and other large American cities was rooted in the social structure of American society. Specifically, Lombardo ties organized crime to the emergence of machine politics in America's urban centers. From nineteenth-century vice syndicates to the modern-day Outfit, Chicago's criminal underworld could not have existed without the blessing of those who controlled municipal, county, and state government. These practices were not imported from Sicily, Lombardo contends, but were bred in the socially disorganized slums of America where elected officials routinely franchised vice and crime in exchange for money and votes. This book also traces the history of the African-American community's participation in traditional organized crime in Chicago and offers new perspectives on the organizational structure of the Chicago Outfit, the traditional organized crime group in Chicago.