History

But for Birmingham

Author: Glenn T. Eskew

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 434

View: 575

Historian Glenn Eskew describes the changing face of Birmingham's civil rights campaign, from the politics of accommodation practiced by the city's black bourgeoisie in the 1950s to local pastor Fred L. Shuttlesworth's groundbreaking use of nonviolent direct action to challenge segregation during the late 1950s and early 1960s. Maps, notes, bibliography, index. 25 illustrations.
Cooking

Southern Living No Taste Like Home

Author: Editors of Southern Living Magazine

Publisher: Time Home Entertainment

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 320

View: 211

There's no region of the country more cherished and unique when it comes to food than the South. Southerners celebrate our food traditions. They are totems of our collective identity. Our grits, our fried chicken, our sweet tea, our butterbeans, our biscuits: These are powerful symbols of not just of Southern tastes but also of Southern values, of the kind of simple, honest-to-goodness home cooking, prepared with generosity of spirit and served up with generosity of ladle. These recipes are what distinguish and bind Southern culture. No Taste Like Home embraces the cultural identity of towns large and small all throughout the South and provides readers with recipes, stories, and highlights of all the unique regional flavors -- from the Heartland of Dixie to Cajun Country, from The Coastal South to Bluegrass, Bourbon and BBQ Country and all points in between. Organized geographically, the cookbook focuses on each of 6 regions in the South. Every chapter will include highlights of specific towns and contain essays describing, literally, the flavor of the place. The highlighted towns will offer multiple recipes as well as musings from notable locals, and "locally famous" chefs. Just some of the recurring editorial features include: a travelogue introduction discussing regional specialties and folklore Standout recipes from local chefs and "almost famous" home cooks Musings from locals about their town "Hometown Flavor" features on Southern iconic ingredients that are commonly used in the regional cuisine "What We're Craving" features highlighting a local restaurant or town-specific dish that locals crave when they're not at home "Local Know-how" features of insider secrets from the locals, from how to pick the freshest produce, to the best way to prepare their own recipes
Fiction

Crimes in Southern Indiana

Author: Frank Bill

Publisher: FSG Originals

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 253

A ferocious debut that puts Frank Bill's southern Indiana on the literary map next to Cormac McCarthy's eastern Tennessee and Daniel Woodrell's Missouri Ozarks Crimes in Southern Indiana is the most blistering, vivid, flat-out fearless debut to plow into American literature in recent years. Frank Bill delivers what is both a wake-up call and a gut punch. Welcome to heartland America circa right about now, when the union jobs and family farms that kept the white on the picket fences have given way to meth labs, backwoods gunrunners, and bare-knuckle brawling. Bill's people are pressed to the brink—and beyond. There is Scoot McCutchen, whose beloved wife falls terminally ill, leaving him with nothing to live for—which doesn't quite explain why he brutally murders her and her doctor and flees, or why, after years of running, he decides to turn himself in. In the title story, a man who has devolved from breeding hounds for hunting to training them for dog-fighting crosses paths with a Salvadoran gangbanger tasked with taking over the rural drug trade, but who mostly wants to grow old in peace. As Crimes in Sourthern Indiana unfolds, we witness the unspeakable, yet are compelled to find sympathy for the depraved. Bill's southern Indiana is haunted with the deep, authentic sense of place that recalls the best of Southern fiction, but the interconnected stories bristle with the urban energy of a Chuck Palahniuk or a latter-day Nelson Algren and rush with the slam-bang plotting of pulp-noir crime writing à la Jim Thompson. Bill's prose is gritty yet literary, shocking, and impossible to put down. A dark evocation of the survivalist spirit of the working class, this is a brilliant debut by an important new voice.
Juvenile Nonfiction

Cooking the Southern African Way

Author: Kari Cornell

Publisher: Lerner Publications

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 72

View: 964

Southern Africa is a diverse land. It is home to many groups of native Africans, each with its own traditions, culture, and foods, as well as European and Asian settlers that arrived in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. The various cultures have combined to make eating in Southern Africa a delightful adventure.
Biography & Autobiography

No One Ever Asked Me

Author: Hollis Dorion Stabler

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 183

View: 937

As a young adolescent, Hollis Dorion Stabler underwent a Native ceremony in which he was given the new name Na-zhin-thia, Slow to Rise. It was a name that no white person asked to know during Hollis's tour of duty in Anzio, his unacknowledged difference as an Omaha Indian adding to the poignancy of his uneasy fellowship with foreign and American soldiers alike. Stabler?s story?coming of age on the American plains, going to war, facing new estrangement upon coming home?is a universal one, rendered wonderfully strange and personal by Stabler?s uncommon perspective, which embraces two worlds, and by his unique voice. ø Stabler's experiences during World War II?tours of duty in Tunisia and Morocco as well as Italy and France, and the loss of his brother in battle?are at the center of this powerful memoir, which tells of growing up as an Omaha Indian in the small-town Midwest of Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, and Oklahoma in the 1920s and 1930s. A descendant of the Indians who negotiated with Lewis and Clark on the Missouri River, Stabler describes a childhood that was a curious mixture of progressivism and Indian tradition, and that culminated in his enlisting in the old horse cavalry when war broke out?a path not so very different from that walked by his ancestors. Victoria Smith, of Cherokee-Delaware descent, interweaves historical insight with Stabler?s vivid reminiscences, providing a rich context for this singular life.
History

Southern Cultures: The Politics Issue

Author: Harry L. Watson

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 605

In the Fall 2012 issue of Southern Cultures… Guest Editor Ferrel Guillory's special election-year Politics issue features: Five Big Things You Need to Know About the South for this Election The Past, Present, and Future of Southern Politics Jack Bass on Citizens United, Strom Thurmond, the Southern Strategy, and Jackie O Control of Public Schools and the Politics of Desegregation The South in the Shadow of Nazism Documenting the Political Immigrant Debate Today Bill Clinton on . . . Bill Clinton . . . and more. Southern Cultures is published quarterly (spring, summer, fall, winter) by the University of North Carolina Press. The journal is sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Center for the Study of the American South.
History

No Peace for the Wicked

Author: David Rolfs

Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 692

The first comprehensive work of its kind, David Rolfs' No Peace for the Wicked sheds new light on the Northern Protestant soldiers' religious worldview and the various ways they used it to justify and interpret their wartime experiences. Drawing extensive
Reference

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Author: Bill C. Malone

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 448

View: 227

Southern music has flourished as a meeting ground for the traditions of West African and European peoples in the region, leading to the evolution of various traditional folk genres, bluegrass, country, jazz, gospel, rock, blues, and southern hip-hop. This much-anticipated volume in The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture celebrates an essential element of southern life and makes available for the first time a stand-alone reference to the music and music makers of the American South. With nearly double the number of entries devoted to music in the original Encyclopedia, this volume includes 30 thematic essays, covering topics such as ragtime, zydeco, folk music festivals, minstrelsy, rockabilly, white and black gospel traditions, and southern rock. And it features 174 topical and biographical entries, focusing on artists and musical outlets. From Mahalia Jackson to R.E.M., from Doc Watson to OutKast, this volume considers a diverse array of topics, drawing on the best historical and contemporary scholarship on southern music. It is a book for all southerners and for all serious music lovers, wherever they live.