Transportation

The Urie and Maunsell Cylinder 4-6-0s

Author: David Maidment

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 264

View: 888

This book is one in the Pen & Sword Transport History imprint in the ‘Locomotive Portfolio’ series and covers the family of two-cylinder 4-6-0s designed and built by the Chief Mechanical Engineers of the London & South Western and Southern Railways between 1914 and 1936, which survived well into the era of British Railways. The N15 ‘King Arthur’ class of express passenger engines were the mainstay of the Southern Railway’s passenger business between the two world wars, but both Robert Urie and Richard Maunsell built mixed traffic and freight locomotives of a similar ilk forming a ‘King Arthur’ family of locomotives for all purposes that were simple, robust and long lived. This book describes the conception, design and construction of the N15, H15 and S15 classes and the N15X rebuilds of the LB&SCR ‘Baltic Tanks’ and their operation in traffic before and after the Second World War, until the withdrawal of the last Maunsell 4-6-0 in 1965. The book includes extensive personal recollections of the author, who both saw and travelled on hundreds of trains hauled by many of these engines in the 1950s and ‘60s, and gives a brief summary of those that have been preserved on Britain’s heritage railways. The book is copiously illustrated with over 200 black and white and colour illustrations.
Transportation

The German Pacific Locomotive: Its Design and Development

Author: David Maidment

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 400

View: 980

The German Pacific Locomotive (Its Design and Development) is David Maidments fourth book in the series of Locomotive Profiles published by Pen & Sword. It is the first in the series to tackle an important range of overseas steam locomotives, the German pacific locomotives, which, with the Paris-Orleans pacific in France, were the first of that wheel layout in Europe and came to be the dominant type for express passenger work throughout Western Europe for the following fifty years, until displaced by diesel and electric traction. The German railways in the first two decades of the twentieth century were run principally as regional State railways, and two distinct styles of design developed, which were influenced by the natural terrain. In the south, in the mountainous foothills of the European Alps, four cylinder compound locomotives with comparatively small coupled wheels, most produced by the famous firm of Maffei in Munich, held sway from 1907 until the late 1930s, and in parts of Bavaria that were not yet electrified, even until the early 1960s. In the flatter lands of the north, Prussian 4-6-0s sufficed until Paul Wagners standard two cylinder simple pacifics came onto the scene in 1925, and were followed by the three cylinder streamlined pacifics at the start of the Second World War. After addressing the devastating damage to the German railways in the conflict, the book follows the modernization of the locomotive fleet in the postwar period until the elimination of steam in both East and West Germany in the mid-late 1970s. The book describes the design, construction and operation of the full range of pacifics that ran in both parts of Germany, and the large numbers of these locomotives that have been preserved, and is illustrated with over 180 black and white and 80 colour photos.
Transportation

The Brighton Atlantics

Author: James S. Baldwin

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 176

View: 309

The Brighton Atlantic locomotives were some of the most handsome machines ever constructed at Brighton Works. They were signed by the D. Earl Marsh, Locomotive Superintendent of the London Brighton and South Coast Railway, and produced as two classes, the H1, introduced in 1905-1906, and the H2, introduced in 19111912.The Brighton Atlantic type has had a following among enthusiasts and model engineers for over a century, with many fine examples of models of these machines being constructed in all scales, both as live steam and electric powered.Great interest is still there today, with many models of these fine locomotives on show at model engineering exhibitions and on smaller scale Brighton or Southern layouts.The Bluebell Railway in East Sussex is currently constructing a full-size replica of the last H2 Atlantic (Beachy Head) in a workshop at Sheffield Park, using some parts from the original locomotive and a rescued Great Northern Atlantic boiler. The project to construct a replica machine has aroused a great deal of public interest in this design of locomotive. At this time there are no books available on the market for anyone who would like to construct a model on, or take an interest in, the replica project on the Bluebell Railway.
Southern Railway Company (Great Britain)

The Southern Railway

Author: Roger Wakely Kidner

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Southern Railway Company (Great Britain)

Page: 54

View: 652

London and South Western Railway Locomotives

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: Books LLC, Wiki Series

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 162

View: 210

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 35. Chapters: LSWR N15 class, LSWR M7 class, LSWR S15 class, LSWR 415 class, LSWR 0298 Class, LSWR O2 class, List of King Arthur class locomotives, LSWR T9 class, LSWR H15 class, LSWR T14 class, LSWR L12 class, LSWR G6 class, LSWR S11 class, LSWR 46 class, LSWR D15 class, LSWR G14 class, LSWR P14 class, LSWR F13 class, LSWR L11 class, LSWR K10 class, LSWR 395 class, LSWR E14 class, LSWR G16 class, W24 Calbourne, LSWR T7 class, LSWR 330 class, LSWR 700 class, LSWR 460 class, List of Isle of Wight-based O2 Class locomotives, LSWR H16 class, LSWR A12 class, LSWR B4 class, LSWR T3 class, LSWR X2 class, LSWR T1 class, LSWR X6 class, LSWR T6 class, LSWR 445 class. Excerpt: The LSWR N15 class was a British 2-cylinder 4-6-0 express passenger steam locomotive designed by Robert W. Urie. The class has a complex build history spanning three sub-classes and eight years of construction from 1919 to 1926. The first batch of the class was constructed for the London and South Western Railway (LSWR), where they hauled heavy express trains to the south coast ports and further west to Exeter. Following the grouping of railway companies in 1923, the LSWR became part of the Southern Railway (SR) and its publicity department gave the N15 locomotives names associated with Arthurian legend; the class hence becoming known as King Arthurs. The Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the newly-formed company, Richard Maunsell, modified the Urie locomotives in the light of operational experience and increased the class strength to 74 locomotives. Maunsell and his Chief Draughtsman James Clayton incorporated several improvements, notably to the steam circuit and valve gear. The new locomotives were built over several batches at Eastleigh and Glasgow, leading to the nicknames of "Eastleigh Arthurs" and "Scotch Arthurs" in service. The class was subjected to smoke ...
Technology & Engineering

Some classic locomotives

Author: Cuthbert Hamilton Ellis

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 173

View: 143

Transportation

Yesterday's Railways

Author: Peter Herring

Publisher: David & Charles Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 288

View: 202

Britons have always viewed their railway system with a mixture of affection, amusement and exasperation. Yet there were also periods in the twentieth century when Britain's railways were a source of pride and excitement. Many still recall when the train was their principal means of travel, whether to school or work, to visit friends and relatives, or to go on holiday. And it wasn't just people that went by train: the food that fed them, the bricks that built their homes, the coal that heated them, were all carried by train. This book celebrates this time when a train journey remained an adventure, and when the steam locomotives that made the journey possible were a source of awe and fascination. Those journeys are recalled in Yesterday's Railways, alongside the eventful journey made by all of Britain's railways from the ground-breaking years of the 1900s to the day in August 1968 that the fires were put out for the last time.