Fiction

The World That We Knew

Author: Alice Hoffman

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 780

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * LONGLISTED FOR THE ANDREW CARNEGIE MEDAL On the brink of World War II, with the Nazis tightening their grip on Berlin, a mother’s act of courage and love offers her daughter a chance of survival. “[A] hymn to the power of resistance, perseverance, and enduring love in dark times…gravely beautiful…Hoffman the storyteller continues to dazzle.” —THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW At the time when the world changed, Hanni Kohn knows she must send her twelve-year-old daughter away to save her from the Nazi regime. Her desperation leads her to Ettie, the daughter of a rabbi whose years spent eavesdropping on her father enables her to create a mystical Jewish creature, a rare and unusual golem, who is sworn to protect Hanni’s daughter, Lea. Once Ava is brought to life, she and Lea and Ettie become eternally entwined, their paths fated to cross, their fortunes linked. What does it mean to lose your mother? How much can one person sacrifice for love? In a world where evil can be found at every turn, we meet remarkable characters that take us on a stunning journey of loss and resistance, the fantastical and the mortal, in a place where all roads lead past the Angel of Death and love is never-ending.
Social Science

Wish We Knew What to Say

Author: Dr Pragya Agarwal

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 739

'A thoughtful, prescient read for any mother or father parenting through the unique challenges of this racially polarised year, decade and beyond' Kenya Hunt 'Comprehensive, readable, and so very important. The next generation needs you to read this book' Clare Mackintosh, Sunday Times bestselling author 'A vital book that equips us to have conversations about race and racism with young people, ensuring we are all playing our part to raise the next generations as anti-racist. With excellent, clear advice from Dr Agarwal I Wish We Knew What to Say is a quick, engaging and easily digestible read' Nikesh Shukla We want our children to thrive and flourish in a diverse, multi-cultural world and we owe it to them to help them make sense of the confusing and emotionally charged messages they receive about themselves and others. These early years are the most crucial when children are curious about the world around them, but are also quick to form stereotypes and biases that can become deeply ingrained as they grow older. These are the people who are going to inherit this world, and we owe it to them to lay a strong foundation for the next phases of their lives. Wish We Knew What to Say is a timely and urgent book that gives scenarios, questions, thought starters, resources and advice in an accessible manner on how to tackle tricky conversations around race and racism with confidence and awareness. it brings in the science of how children perceive race and form racial identity, combining it with personal stories and experiences to create a handy guide that every parent would refer to again and again. Written by behavioural and data scientist, Dr Pragya Agarwal, Wish We Knew What to Say will help all parents, carers and educators give children the tools and vocabulary to talk about people's differences and similarities in an open, non-judgemental, curious way, and help them address any unfairness they might see or encounter.
History

The Devil We Knew

Author: H. W. Brands

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 605

In the late 1950s, Washington was driven by its fear of communist subversion: it saw the hand of Kremlin behind developments at home and across the globe. The FBI was obsessed with the threat posed by American communist party--yet party membership had sunk so low, writes H.W. Brands, that it could have fit "inside a high-school gymnasium," and it was so heavily infiltrated that J. Edgar Hoover actually contemplated using his informers as a voting bloc to take over the party. Abroad, the preoccupation with communism drove the White House to help overthrow democratically elected governments in Guatemala and Iran, and replace them with dictatorships. But by then the Cold War had long since blinded Americans to the ironies of their battle against communism. In The Devil We Knew, Brands provides a witty, perceptive history of the American experience of the Cold War, from Truman's creation of the CIA to Ronald Reagan's creation of SDI. Brands has written a number of highly regarded works on America in the twentieth century; here he puts his experience to work in a volume of impeccable scholarship and exceptional verve. He turns a critical eye to the strategic conceptions (and misconceptions) that led a once-isolationist nation to pursue the war against communism to the most remote places on Earth. By the time Eisenhower left office, the United States was fighting communism by backing dictators from Iran to South Vietnam, from Latin America to the Middle East--while engaging in covert operations the world over. Brands offers no apologies for communist behavior, but he deftly illustrates the strained thinking that led Washington to commit gravely disproportionate resources (including tens of thousands of lives in Korea and Vietnam) to questionable causes. He keenly analyzes the changing policies of each administration, from Nixon's juggling (SALT talks with Moscow, new relations with Ccmmunist China, and bombing North Vietnam) to Carter's confusion to Reagan's laserrattling. Equally important is his incisive, often amusing look at how the anti-Soviet struggle was exploited by politicians, industrialists, and government agencies. He weaves in deft sketches of figures like Barry Goldwater and Henry Jackson (who won a Senate seat with the promise, "Many plants will be converting from peace time to all-out defense production"). We see John F. Kennedy deliver an eloquent speech in 1957 defending the rising forces of nationalism in Algeria and Vietnam; we also see him in the White House a few years later, ordering a massive increase in America's troop commitment to Saigon. The book ranges through the economics and psychology of the Cold War, demonstrating how the confrontation created its own constituencies in private industry and public life. In the end, Americans claimed victory in the Cold War, but Brands's account gives us reason to tone down the celebrations. "Most perversely," he writes, "the call to arms against communism caused American leaders to subvert the principles that constituted their country's best argument against communism." This far-reaching history makes clear that the Cold War was simultaneously far more, and far less, than we ever imagined at the time.
Biography & Autobiography

Simone Weil as We Knew Her

Author: Joseph Marie Perrin

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 160

View: 527

Simone Weil (1909-1943) was a defining figure of the twentieth century; a philosopher, Christian (although never baptised), resistance fighter, Labour activist and teacher, described by Albert Camus as 'the only great spirit of our time'. In 1941 Weil was introduced to Father Joseph-Marie Perrin, a Dominican priest whose friendship became a key influence on her life. When Weil asked Perrin for work as a farm hand he sent her to Gustave Thibon, a farmer and Christian philosopher. Weil stayed with the Thibon family, working in the fields and writing the notebooks which became Gravity and Grace and other posthumous works. Perrin and Thibon met Weil at a time when her spiritual life and creative genius were at their height. During the short but deep period of their acquaintance with her, they came to know her as she actually was. First published in English in 1953, and now introduced by J.P. Little, this unique portrait depicts Weil through the eyes of her friends, not as a strange and unaccountable genius but as an ardent and human person in search of truth and knowledge.
History

This Time We Knew

Author: Thomas Cushman

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 423

View: 251

This book punctures once and for all common excuses for Western inaction in the face of incontrovertible evidence of the most egregious crimes against humanity to occur in Europe since World War II.
Social Science

If Only We Knew

Author: John Willinsky

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 262

View: 755

First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Fiction

We Knew That ...

Author: Luigi Savagnone

Publisher: BookRix

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 190

View: 498

Among rantings due to a growing daily stress a narrator tells the story of Anna and Lucia, two girls of Italian origin, who after spending a childhood and a peaceful and happy childhood in Borneo discovered a love affair between their parents, so disgusted, they decide to leave and reach Italy. Here find a very closed society, resulting in great difficulty in entering and get to know people. However, they manage to find a permanent job, but it soon proves a real torture. They are also able to find a partner, but with the help of a marriage agency. Here begin the visits to some of the most important places and monuments of Sicily, but also of Rome, Florence, Pisa and Venice, where Anna spends her honeymoon. This is illustrated by several images and accurate historical reconstructions. When for the two friends finally everything seemed to go for the best, something happens ... In this first part, which can be defined a fable with a final suspense, however, are treated different topics of scientific, philosophical, architectural and cultural heritage. But this romance stimulates the narrator in an uncontrollable desire to escape from the monotonous and meaningless life he leads. With a small boat so he faces the open sea in search of the freedom that in his squalid life has never been able to find. He finds the love of a mermaid and live an extraordinary adventure into the depths. But the misfortune is always lurking ...
Business & Economics

Deming The Way We Knew Him

Author: Frank Voehl

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 200

View: 715

Perhaps no other person in the history of modern business has so profoundly affected the methods of quality improvement in industry than W. Edwards Deming. The subject of many books, articles, and television documentaries, Dr. Deming has become the world-recognized leader of the quality movement in industry. For the first time anywhere, the fascinating story of how Dr. Deming's legend grew is told from an unprecedented perspective in a new book, Deming: The Way We Knew Him. Each of the 14 chapters in this compelling volume focuses on and relates to one of Deming's notable 14 points, with each chapter written by a world renowned expert or pioneer in the quality movement. Chapters begin with a brief explanation of the Deming philosophy, followed by a personal account from those who knew and were close to Dr. Deming. This remarkable tribute summming up Deming's unusual deeds, character, and position in life is written in the words and perspectives of experts such as Myron Tribus, Homer Sarasohn, Howard Gitlow, Mary Walton, David and Carol Schwinn, Nancy Mann, and others. By building these personal testimonies around his philosophy and concepts, this book weaves a unique consistency and deeper understanding of Deming and his genius. New insights and a wealth of information about this celebrated man ensures that this work breakthroughs the standards of anything else written on Deming. Highly readable as a collection of essays rich with special, personal observances on the life, times, and innovative genius of Deming, this book has a universal appeal that guarantees its place as a valuable contribution to the literature on this great man.
History

The Land We Saw, the Times We Knew

Author: Gerald Groemer

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 147

Japanese zuihitsu (essays) offer a treasure trove of information and insights rarely found in any other genre of Japanese writing. Especially during their golden age, the Edo period (1600–1868), zuihitsu treated a great variety of subjects. In the pages of a typical zuihitsu the reader encountered facts and opinions on everything from martial arts to music, food to fashions, dragons to drama—much of it written casually and seemingly without concern for form or order. The seven zuihitsu translated and annotated in this volume date from the early seventeenth to the late nineteenth centuries. Some of the essays are famous while others are less well known, but none have been published in their entirety in any Western language. Following a substantial introduction outlining the development of the genre, “Tales That Come to Mind” is an early seventeenth-century account of Edo kabuki theater and the Yoshiwara “pleasure quarters” penned by a Buddhist monk. “A Record of Seven Offered Treasures,” composed by a retired samurai-monk near the end of the seventeenth century, starts as a treatise on the proper education of youth but ends as a critique of the author’s own life and moral failings. Perhaps the most famous piece in the volume, “Monologue,” was drafted by the renowned Confucianist Dazai Shundai, a keen and insightful observer of life during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Dazai treats, in turn, poetry, the tea ceremony, comic verse, music, theater, and fashion. “Idle Talk of Nagasaki” is an entertaining record of a journey to Nagasaki by a group of Confucianists in the early eighteenth century. In “Kyoto Observed,” a mid-eighteenth-century Edo resident compares the shogun’s and the emperor’s capital in a series of brief vignettes. An 1814 zuihitsu classic written by a physician, “A Dustheap of Discourses” presents another colorful mosaic of topics related to life in Edo. The book closes with “The Breezes of Osaka,” a lively essay by a highly cultured Edo administrator contrasting the food, life, and culture of his hometown with that of Osaka, where he briefly served as mayor in the 1850s.