Law

Tracing the Roles of Soft Law in Human Rights

Author: Stéphanie Lagoutte

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 330

View: 197

Soft law increasingly shapes and impacts the content of international law in multiple ways, from being a first step in a norm-making process to providing detailed rules and technical standards required for the interpretation and the implementation of treaties. This is especially true in the area of human rights. While relatively few human rights treaties have been adopted at the UN level in the last two decades, the number of declarations, resolutions, conclusions, and principles has grown significantly. In some areas, soft law has come to fill a void in the absence of treaty law, exerting a degree of normative force exceeding its non-binding character. In others areas, soft law has become a battleground for interpretative struggles to expand and limit human rights protection in the context of existing regimes. Despite these developments, little attention has been paid to soft law within human rights legal scholarship. Building on a thorough analysis of relevant case studies, this volume systematically explores the roles of soft law in both established and emerging human rights regimes. The book argues that a better understanding of how soft law shapes and affects different branches of international human rights law not only provides a more dynamic picture of the current state of international human rights, but also helps to unsettle and critically question certain political and doctrinal beliefs. Following introductory chapters that lay out the general conceptual framework, the book is divided in two parts. The first part focuses on cases that examine the role of soft law within human rights regimes where there are established hard law standards, its progressive and regressive effects, and the role that different actors play in the incubation process. The second part focuses on the role of soft law in emerging areas of international law where there is no substantial treaty codification of norms. These chapters examine the relationship between soft and hard law, the role of different actors in formulating new soft law, and the potential for eventual codification.
Human rights

Tracing the Roles of Soft Law in Human Rights

Author: John Cerone

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Human rights

Page:

View: 894

Building on a thorough analysis of relevant case studies, this volume systematically explores the roles of soft law in both established and emerging human rights regimes.

Research Handbook on International Law and Natural Resources

Author: Elisa Morgera

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 568

View: 115

The Research Handbook on International Law and Natural Resources provides a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the role of international law in regulating the exploration and exploitation of natural resources. The book covers overarching and sectoral, as well as traditional and emerging, legal issues in natural resource development.The book illuminates interactions and tensions between international environmental law, human rights and economic law, as well as the law of the sea, tracing their evolution and identifying critical areas for further investigation. It also discusses the relevance of soft law and international dispute settlement, as well as of various unilateral, bilateral, regional and transnational initiatives in the governance of natural resources. Analysis of historical and current policy debates, including the incipient negotiations of a new international legally binding instrument on marine biodiversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction and the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement on climate change, are included.While the Handbook is accessible to those approaching the subject for the first time, it identifies pressing areas for further investigation that will be of interest to advanced researchers and practitioners of international environmental, economic and human rights law.
Law

African Human Rights Law Journal Volume 20 No 2 2020

Author:

Publisher: Pretoria University Law Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page:

View: 841

In 2020, the African Human Rights Law Journal (AHRLJ or Journal) celebrates 20 years since it first was published. The AHRLJ is the only peer-reviewed journal focused on human rights-related topics of relevance to Africa, Africans and scholars of Africa. It is a time for celebration. Since 2001, two issues of the AHRLJ have appeared every year. Initially published by Juta, in Cape Town, South Africa, in 2013 it became as an open-access journal published by the Pretoria University Law Press (PULP). PULP is a non-profit open-access publisher focused on advancing African scholarship. The AHRLJ contains peer-reviewed articles and ‘recent developments’, discussing the latest court decisions and legal developments in the African Union (AU) and regional economic communities. It contains brief discussions of recently-published books. With a total of 517 contributions in 40 issues (436 articles and 81 ‘recent developments’; not counting ‘book reviews’), on average the AHRLJ contains around 13 contributions per issue. The AHRLJ is accredited with the International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS) and the South African Department of Higher Education, Science and Innovation, and appears in a number of open access portals, including AfricanLii, the Directory of Open Access Journals and SciELO. Over the 20 years of its existence, many significant articles appeared in the AHRLJ. According to Google Scholar the mostcited articles that have appeared in the Journal over this period are (i) T Metz ‘Ubuntu as a moral theory and human rights in South Africa’ (2011) 11 African Human Rights Law Journal 532-559 (with 273 citations); (ii) D Cornell and K van Marle ‘Exploring ubuntu: Tentative reflections’ (2005) 5 African Human Rights Law Journal 195- 220 (with 97 citations); (iii) S Tamale ‘Exploring the contours of African sexualities: Religion, law and power’ (2014) 14 African Human Rights Law Journal 150-177 (with 85 citations); K Kindiki ‘The normative and institutional framework of the African Union relating to the protection of human rights and the maintenance of international peace and security: A critical appraisal’ (2003) 3 African Human Rights Law Journal 97-117 (with 59 citations); and T Kaime ‘The Convention on the Rights of the Child and the cultural legitimacy of children’s rights in Africa: Some reflections’ (2005) 5 African Human Rights Law Journal 221-238) (with 54 citations). This occasion allows some perspective on the role that the Journal has played over the past 20 years. It is fair to say that the AHRLJ contributed towards strengthening indigenous African scholarship, in general, and human rights-related themes, specifically. Before the Journal there was no academic ‘outlet’ devoted to human rights in the broader African context. Both in quantity and in quality the Journal has left its mark on the landscape of scholarly journals. The AHRLJ has provided a forum for African voices, including those that needed to be ‘fine-tuned’. Different from many other peerreviewed journals, the AHRLJ has seen it as its responsibility to nurture emerging but not yet fully-flourishing talent. This approach allowed younger and emerging scholars to be guided to sharpen their skills and find their scholarly voices. The AHRLJ has evolved in tandem with the African regional human rights system, in a dialogic relationship characterised by constructive criticism. When the Journal was first published in 2001, the Protocol on the Establishment of an African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights (African Court Protocol) was not yet in force. Over the years the Journal tracked the evolution of the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights (African Court) from a faltering start, through a phase when it increasingly expressed itself in an emerging jurisprudence, to the current situation of push-back by states signalled by the withdrawal by four states of their acceptance of the Court’s direct individual access jurisdiction. The same is largely true for the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (African Children’s Committee). It was in 2001 that the AU elected the first members of this Committee. It first met in 2002, and its first decade or so was lackluster. The Committee examined its first state report only in November 2008, and decided its first communication in March 2011. Articles by authors such as Mezmur and Sloth-Nielsen, who also served as members of the Committee, and Lloyd, placed the spotlight on the work of the Committee. Initially, these articles primarily served to describe and provide information that otherwise was largely inaccessible, but over time they increasingly provided a critical gaze and contributed to the constructive evolution of the Committee’s exercise of its mandate. By 2011 the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights (African Commission) was already quite well established, but it also underwent significant growth over the subsequent 20-year period. Numerous articles in the Journal trace and analyse aspects of this evolution. Contributions in the Journal also cover most of the AU human rights treaties and soft law standards. A number of issues contain a ‘special focus’ section dealing with a thematic issue of particular relevance or concern, such as the focus on the Protocol to the African Charter on the Rights of Women (2006 no 1); ‘30 years of the African Charter’ (2011 no 2); and ‘sexual and reproductive rights and the African Women’s Protocol’ (2014 no 2). The scope of the Journal extends beyond the supranational dimension of human rights. Over the years many contributions explored aspects of the domestic human rights situation in countries such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda and Zimbabwe. From time to time the specific focus sections also veered towards domestic human rights protection. See for instance the focus on 20 years of the South African Constitution (2014 no 2); on ‘adolescent sexual and reproductive rights in the African region’ (2017 no 2); on ‘the rule of law in sub-Saharan Africa’ (2018 no 1); and on ‘dignity taking and dignity restorations’ (2018 no 2).
Law

International Law

Author: Jeffrey L. Dunoff

Publisher: Aspen Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 1018

View: 369

Instructors want to explore the processes of international lawmaking through an interdisciplinary approach and problem pedagogy will welcome this new casebook from an outstanding author team. the authors lead students from fundamental to sophisticated topics, through 14 chapters organized into six parts: Introduction to International Law and Lawmaking Participants in the International Legal Process the Interaction of International and Domestic Law the Protection of Human Dignity Interdependence and Integration: The Challenge of Collective Action Problems Challenges to International Law in addition to its emphasis on lawmaking and decisionmaking in the international arena, this new casebook is distinguished by its: excellent authorship; all three contributors are distinguished young scholars known For The quality of their writing problem approach, using real-life examples to illustrate key topics such as state formation (the former Yugoslavia), corporations as international legal actors (the apparel industry in developing states), constructing an environmental regime (protecting ozone layer), The tensions between trade and environmental politics (the tuna-dolphin problem), and responding to uses of force (the Gulf War) emphasis on the creation of implementation, and interpretation of international norms interdisciplinary materials, incorporating perspectives from economics, political science, and critical and feminist legal studies coverage of cutting-edge topics, including International Criminal Law; Environmental Law and regulation, and trade and investment use of maps, photographs, and other visual material to enliven the text manageable length, well-suited to an upper-level course
International law

Proceedings of the ... Annual Meeting

Author: American Society of International Law. Annual Meeting

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: International law

Page:

View: 247

Law

International Law and Armed Conflict

Author: Noëlle Quénivet

Publisher: T.M.C. Asser Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 462

View: 801

While a more traditional approach to international law and armed conflict focuses on the use of force and international humanitarian law, this book incorporates other international legal regimes such as human rights law, international private law, international criminal law, environmental law, as well as regional and national legal regimes. In doing so, a broader picture emerges and reveals the current challenges faced by lawyers in regulating armed conflicts. This in turn highlights the complexities, intricacies, and the interrelationship of the different regimes that may be rendered applicable to armed conflicts. Also, in taking a more inclusive approach, this book provides a new perspective on both existing and emerging themes in this field. The topics covered in this book include privatisation of warfare, protection of the environment, use of natural resources to support armed conflicts, involvement of children in armed conflicts, the relationship between peace, security and justice.
Law

The New Law and Economic Development

Author: David M. Trubek

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page:

View: 693

This book is a collection of essays that identify and analyze a new phase in thinking about the role of law in economic development and in the practices of development agencies that support law reform. The authors trace the history of theory and doctrine in this field, relating it to changing ideas about development and its institutional practices. The essays describe a new phase in thinking about the relation between law and economic development and analyze how this rising consensus differs from previous efforts to use law as an instrument to achieve social and economic progress. In analyzing the current phase, these essays also identify tensions and contradictions in current practice. This work is a comprehensive treatment of this emerging paradigm, situating it within the intellectual and historical framework of the most influential development models since World War II.
Social Science

Human Values and Social Change

Author: Thottamon Kantan Kesavan Narayanan Unnithan

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 447

View: 657

"The contribution in this volume focus on a wide range of issues concerning both human values and social change in the context of a multi-cultural and multi-civilizational world, including the perspectives of the social sciences and gandhian studies. It examines the varied dimensions of the search for values, the paradigmatic changes taking place in europe and the west and the questions pertaining to value education and spirituality, as well as the spell of Gandhi and the issues pertaining to non-violence, peace, humanism, colonialism and globalization. Many eminent sociologists, along with a wide range of distinguished scholars, including jurists, philosophers, monks, educationists, literateurs, administrators, political scientists, historians, gandhian scholars, peace activists, professors of andragogy and religion--both from India as well as abroad--have contributed to this festschrift, which is in honour of professor T.K.N. Unnithan, making it a representative, thought-provoking anthology on human values and social change."
Sociology

Sociological Abstracts

Author: Leo P. Chall

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Sociology

Page:

View: 521

CSA Sociological Abstracts abstracts and indexes the international literature in sociology and related disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences. The database provides abstracts of journal articles and citations to book reviews drawn from over 1,800+ serials publications, and also provides abstracts of books, book chapters, dissertations, and conference papers.