Fiction

Two Novellas: In the Sanatorium and Facing the Sea

Author: David Vogel

Publisher: Scribe Publications

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 192

View: 273

David Vogel has long been regarded as a leading figure of Hebrew literature, and his work has been compared to that of Joseph Roth, Thomas Mann, and Franz Kafka. In the Sanatorium was Vogel’s first published work of fiction, translated here into English for the first time. It is set in a charitable Jewish hospital for consumptives, where death is always close, desire is heightened, and breaking the rules is exciting. In his depiction of the sanatorium’s hothouse atmosphere, Vogel masterfully portrays the far-reaching effects of the decadence that was so prevalent in early-twentieth-century Europe. Written in 1932, Facing the Sea tells the story of a couple spending the summer on the French Riviera. Their idyllic holiday, however, ends up testing their relationship in ways they never thought possible. Deeply evocative of a bygone era, and intensely erotic, it shows Vogel at the height of his powers. Published together, these two novellas celebrate the legacy of one of the twentieth century’s great writers.
Fiction

Two Novellas

Author: David Vogel

Publisher: Scribe Publications

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 192

View: 506

David Vogel has long been regarded as a leading figure of Hebrew literature, and his work has been compared to that of Joseph Roth, Thomas Mann, and Franz Kafka.

In the Sanatorium was Vogel’s first published work of fiction, translated here into English for the first time. It is set in a charitable Jewish hospital for consumptives, where death is always close, desire is heightened, and breaking the rules is exciting. In his depiction of the sanatorium’s hothouse atmosphere, Vogel masterfully portrays the far-reaching effects of the decadence that was so prevalent in early-twentieth-century Europe.

Written in 1932, Facing the Sea tells the story of a couple spending the summer on the French Riviera. Their idyllic holiday, however, ends up testing their relationship in ways they never thought possible. Deeply evocative of a bygone era, and intensely erotic, it shows Vogel at the height of his powers.

Published together, these two novellas celebrate the legacy of one of the twentieth century’s great writers.
Fiction

Married Life

Author: David Vogel

Publisher: Scribe Publications

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 512

View: 532

David Vogel has long been regarded as a leading figure of Hebrew literature, and his work has been compared to that of Joseph Roth, Thomas Mann, and Franz Kafka. Married Life, which was first published in 1929, is Vogel’s magnum opus — a sweeping portrait of a doomed marriage and a doomed city. Set in Vienna, the novel tells of the relationship between the penniless writer Rudolf Gurdweill and Baroness Thea von Takow, who treats her husband with cruelty and disdain. In spite of this, Gurdweill struggles to find the will to leave his wife, even when the devoted Lotte Bondheim offers him the prospect of true happiness. Yet this is no mere story of a love triangle. In astonishingly vivid detail, Vogel evokes the atmosphere of 1920s Vienna, taking us from fashionable cafés and aristocratic estates to the shoemaker’s workshop and the almshouse. With decadence and poverty existing side by side, Vienna is depicted as a city on the brink of collapse — a haunting prefigurement of the horrors to come. With its rich, vital prose, and its profound insight into the human condition, Married Life is truly a modern classic.
History

The Routledge Encyclopedia of Jewish Writers of the Twentieth Century

Author: Sorrel Kerbel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 702

View: 511

Now available in paperback for the first time, Jewish Writers of the Twentieth Century is both a comprehensive reference resource and a springboard for further study. This volume: examines canonical Jewish writers, less well-known authors of Yiddish and Hebrew, and emerging Israeli writers includes entries on figures as diverse as Marcel Proust, Franz Kafka, Tristan Tzara, Eugene Ionesco, Harold Pinter, Tom Stoppard, Arthur Miller, Saul Bellow, Nadine Gordimer, and Woody Allen contains introductory essays on Jewish-American writing, Holocaust literature and memoirs, Yiddish writing, and Anglo-Jewish literature provides a chronology of twentieth-century Jewish writers. Compiled by expert contributors, this book contains over 330 entries on individual authors, each consisting of a biography, a list of selected publications, a scholarly essay on their work and suggestions for further reading.
Literary Criticism

Israeli Poetry of the Holocaust

Author: Yair Mazor

Publisher: Associated University Presse

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 229

View: 456

"The fact that the Holocaust poetry discussed here is also Israeli poetry makes the book even more important and relevant. One may cogently argue that the state of Israel was established on the ashes of the Holocaust. If so, the fact that contemporary Israeli poetry is dedicated to the topic of the Holocaust celebrates the victory of humankind over Nazi atrocities. This book should be of interest to students, teachers, and scholars of the Holocaust, modern Hebrew/Israeli poetry, and literature in general."--BOOK JACKET.
Africa, North

Domes

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Africa, North

Page:

View: 763

Fiction

Eight Great Hebrew Short Novels

Author: Alan Lelchuk

Publisher: Plume

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 392

View: 893

Novels portray the Jewish experience, including family life, the experiences of new immigrants, the misery of war, and the difficulties of Israeli-Arab relations
Hebrew literature, Modern

"Old Wine in New Flasks"

Author: Shachar Mordechai Pinsker

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Hebrew literature, Modern

Page: 610

View: 322

Literary Criticism

Pain, Pining & Pine Trees

Author: Yair Mazor

Publisher: Papyrus Publishing House

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 389

View: 835

Yair Mazor offers an illuminating history of Jewish poetry from Biblical times to the twentieth century. He provides biographies of nine poets—David Fogel, Rachel, Yehuda Amichai, Nathan Zach, Dalia Rabikovitz, Dan Pagis, Yair Horwitz, Yona Wollach, and Ronny Someck—and generous selections of their work in translation. The book includes illustrations by Nachum Gutman. Distributed for the Center for Jewish Studies, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.
Young Adult Fiction

The Jolly Roger Tales: 60+ Pirate Novels, Treasure-Hunt Tales & Sea Adventures

Author: Captain Charles Johnson

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN:

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 9289

View: 276

This carefully edited collection has been designed and formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Treasure Island (Stevenson) Blackbeard: Buccaneer (R. D. Paine) Pieces of Eight (Le Gallienne) Gold-Bug (Edgar A. Poe) The Dark Frigate (C. B. Hawes) Hearts of Three (Jack London) Captain Singleton (Defoe) Swords of Red Brotherhood (Howard) Queen of Black Coast (Howard) Afloat and Ashore (James F. Cooper) Pirate Gow (Defoe) The King of Pirates (Defoe) Barbarossa—King of the Corsairs (E. H. Currey) Homeward Bound (James F. Cooper) Red Rover (Cooper) The Pirate (Walter Scott) Book of Pirates (Howard Pyle) Under the Waves (R. M. Ballantyne) Rose of Paradise (Howard Pyle) Tales of the Fish Patrol (Jack London) Peter Pan and Wendy (J. M. Barrie) Captain Sharkey (Arthur Conan Doyle) The Pirate (Frederick Marryat) Three Cutters (Marryat) Madman and the Pirate (R. M. Ballantyne) Coral Island (Ballantyne) Pirate City (Ballantyne) Gascoyne (Ballantyne) Facing the Flag (Jules Verne) Captain Boldheart (Dickens) Mysterious Island (Jules Verne) Master Key (L. Frank Baum) A Man to His Mate (J. Allan Dunn) Isle of Pirate's Doom (Robert E. Howard) Black Vulmea (Howard) Robinson Crusoe (Defoe) Count of Monte Cristo (A. Dumas) Ghost Pirates (W. H. Hodgson) Offshore Pirate (F. Scott Fitzgerald) The Piccaroon (Michael Scott) The Capture of Panama, 1671 (John Esquemeling) The Malay Proas (James Fenimore Cooper) The Wonderful Fight of the Exchange of Bristol With the Pirates of Algiers (Samuel Purchas) The Daughter of the Great Mogul (Defoe) Morgan at Puerto Bello Among Malay Pirates: A Tale of Adventure and Peril The Ways of the Buccaneers A True Account of Three Notorious Pirates Narrative of the Capture of the Ship Derby, 1735 Francis Lolonois The Fight Between the Dorrill and the Moca Jaddi the Malay Pirate The Terrible Ladrones The Female Captive The Passing of Mogul Mackenzie The Last of the Sea-Rovers Pagan Madonna...
Fiction

Autumn in Yalta

Author: David Shrayer-Petrov

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 248

View: 644

The powerful voice of David Shrayer-Petrov’s immigrant fiction blends Russian, Jewish, and American traditions. Collecting an autobiographical novel and three short stories, Autumn in Yalta brings together the achievements of the great Russian masters Chekhov and Nabokov and the magisterial Jewish and American storytellers Bashevis Singer and Malamud. Shrayer-Petrov’s fiction examines the forces and contradictions of love through different ethnic, religious, and social lenses. Set in Stalinist Russia, the novel Strange Danya Rayev revolves around the wartime experiences of a Jewish Russian boy evacuated from his besieged native Leningrad to a remote village in the Ural Mountains. In the title story Autumn in Yalta, the idealistic protagonist, Dr. Samoylovich, is sent to a Siberian prison camp because of his ill-fated love for Polechka, a tuberculosis patient. In The Love of Akira Watanabe once again unrequited love is the focus of the central character, a displaced Japanese professor at a New England university. A fishing expedition and an old Jewish recipe make for a surprise ending in Carp for the Gefilte Fish, a tale of a childless couple from Belarus and their American employers. In the tradition of other physician-writers, such as Anton Chekhov and William Carlos Williams, Shrayer-Petrov’s prose is marked by analytical exactitude and passionate humanism. Love and memory, dual identity, and the experience of exile are the chief components.
Literature

The New Yorker

Author: Harold Wallace Ross

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Literature

Page:

View: 605