Biography & Autobiography

Unsentimental Reformer

Author: Joan Waugh

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 296

View: 310

A Brahmin, member of an illustrious family, sister of the martyred Robert Gould Shaw, who led his proud black troops against Fort Wagner, and, later, a war widow, Lowell constantly responded to changing ideological and economic conditions affecting the poor.
Philosophy

The Faces of Intellectual Disability

Author: Licia Carlson

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 266

View: 698

In a challenge to current thinking about cognitive impairment, this book explores what it means to treat people with intellectual disabilities in an ethical manner. Reassessing philosophical views of intellectual disability, Licia Carlson shows how we can affirm the dignity and worth of intellectually disabled people first by ending comparisons to nonhuman animals and then by confronting our fears and discomforts. Carlson presents the complex history of ideas about cognitive disability, the treatment of intellectually disabled people, and social and cultural reactions to them. Sensitive and clearly argued, this book offers new insights on recent trends in disability studies and philosophy.
History

The Restless City

Author: Joanne Reitano

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 517

First Published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Social Science

Immigration, Incorporation and Transnationalism

Author: Elliott Robert Barkan

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 260

View: 785

Immigration, Incorporation and Transnationalism is an intriguing collection of articles and essays. It was developed to commemorate the twenty-fifth anniversary of The Journal of American Ethnic History. Its purpose, like that of the Immigration and Ethnic History Society, is to integrate interdisciplinary perspectives and exciting new scholarship on important themes and issues related to immigration and ethnic history. The essays in this work encompass broad perspectives, cases studies, and recent developments. Nancy Foner, in "Then and Now," discusses immigration to New York City from both contemporary and historic perspectives. Christiane Harzig, in "Domestics of the World (Unite?)" explores labor migration systems and personal trajectories of household domestics from both global and historic perspectives. Val Johnson, in "The Moral Aspects of Complex Problems," looks at New York City electoral campaigns against vice and the incorporation of immigrants from 1890-1901. Roger Daniels delves into U.S. immigration policy in a time of war from 1939-1945. Diane Vecchio, in "Ties of Affection," relates family narratives in the history of Italian migration. Barbara Posadas and Roland Guyotte present Chicago's Filipinos in the aftermath of World War II. Deborah Moore asks if anyone is ever "At Home in America?" by revisiting second generation immigrants. With an exceptional case study Sharron Schwartz, in "Bridging the Great Divide," investigates the evolution and impact of Cornish translocalism in Britain and the U.S. Carolle Charles asks if contemporary Haitians are political refugees or economic immigrants? Guillermo Grenier explores the creation and maintenance of Cuban American "exile ideology" based on a 2004 survey of this group. Ester Hernandez, in "Relief Dollars," looks at U.S. policies toward Central America from the 1980s to the present day. In the final essay, Louis Canikar presents the contemporary topic of the Arab American experience. The volume also includes more than thirty review essays making it a fundamental contribution to the field.
Biography & Autobiography

Mary Putnam Jacobi and the Politics of Medicine in Nineteenth-Century America

Author: Carla Bittel

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 975

In the late nineteenth century, as Americans debated the "woman question," a battle over the meaning of biology arose in the medical profession. Some medical men claimed that women were naturally weak, that education would make them physically ill, and that women physicians endangered the profession. Mary Putnam Jacobi (1842-1906), a physician from New York, worked to prove them wrong and argued that social restrictions, not biology, threatened female health. Mary Putnam Jacobi and the Politics of Medicine in Nineteenth-Century America is the first full-length biography of Mary Putnam Jacobi, the most significant woman physician of her era and an outspoken advocate for women's rights. Jacobi rose to national prominence in the 1870s and went on to practice medicine, teach, and conduct research for over three decades. She campaigned for co-education, professional opportunities, labor reform, and suffrage--the most important women's rights issues of her day. Downplaying gender differences, she used the laboratory to prove that women were biologically capable of working, learning, and voting. Science, she believed, held the key to promoting and producing gender equality. Carla Bittel's biography of Jacobi offers a piercing view of the role of science in nineteenth-century women's rights movements and provides historical perspective on continuing debates about gender and science today.
Biography & Autobiography

Mary Breckinridge

Author: Melanie Beals Goan

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 360

View: 345

In 1925 Mary Breckinridge (1881-1965) founded the Frontier Nursing Service (FNS), a public health organization in eastern Kentucky providing nurses on horseback to reach families who otherwise would not receive health care. Through this public health organization, she introduced nurse-midwifery to the United States and created a highly successful, cost-effective model for rural health care delivery that has been replicated throughout the world. In this first comprehensive biography of the FNS founder, Melanie Beals Goan provides a revealing look at the challenges Breckinridge faced as she sought reform and the contradictions she embodied. Goan explores Breckinridge's perspective on gender roles, her charisma, her sense of obligation to live a life of service, her eccentricity, her religiosity, and her application of professionalized, science-based health care ideas. Highly intelligent and creative, Breckinridge also suffered from depression, was by modern standards racist, and fought progress as she aged--sometimes to the detriment of those she served. Breckinridge optimistically believed that she could change the world by providing health care to women and children. She ultimately changed just one corner of the world, but her experience continues to provide powerful lessons about the possibilities and the limitations of reform.
History

West from Appomattox

Author: Heather Cox Richardson

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 301

“This thoughtful, engaging examination of the Reconstruction Era . . . will be appealing . . . to anyone interested in the roots of present-day American politics” (Publishers Weekly). The story of Reconstruction is not simply about the rebuilding of the South after the Civil War. In many ways, the late nineteenth century defined modern America, as Southerners, Northerners, and Westerners forged a national identity that united three very different regions into a country that could become a world power. A sweeping history of the United States from the era of Abraham Lincoln to the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt, this engaging book tracks the formation of the American middle class while stretching the boundaries of our understanding of Reconstruction. Historian Heather Cox Richardson ties the North and West into the post–Civil War story that usually focuses narrowly on the South. By weaving together the experiences of real individuals who left records in their own words—from ordinary Americans such as a plantation mistress, a Native American warrior, and a labor organizer, to prominent historical figures such as Andrew Carnegie, Julia Ward Howe, Booker T. Washington, and Sitting Bull—Richardson tells a story about the creation of modern America.
History

Ashes of the Mind

Author: Martin Griffin

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 265

View: 423

How Northern writers came to grips with the mixed legacy of the Civil War.