Van Horne Letter Book, Issue 5 - Primary Source Edition

Author: Canadian Pacific Railway Company

Publisher: Nabu Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 136

View: 585

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Van Horne Letter Book

Author: Canadian Pacific Railway Company

Publisher: Franklin Classics Trade Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 134

View: 156

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Van Horne Letter Book, Issue 5 - Scholar's Choice Edition

Author: Canadian Pacific Railway Company

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 136

View: 668

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Van Horne

Author: William Cornelius Van Horne

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 138

View: 951

Excerpt from Van Horne: Letter Book 5 I don't see th t there is much prospect of our being, able to meet your views andq. Rutter's as to a general and permanent arrangement for both freight and passenger but I assume that at least so far as passenger business is concerned it will be to your advantage to work 'wlth us even in the absence of any such arrangement. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
Biography & Autobiography

From Telegrapher to Titan

Author: Valerie Knowles

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 504

View: 227

Winner of the 2005 Ottawa Book Award for Non-fiction , the 2005 University of British Columbia Award for Best Canadian Biography, and the Canadian Railroad Historical Association Award for Best Railway Book of the Year. William Van Horne was one of North America’s most accomplished men. Born in Illinois in 1843, he became a prominent railway figure in the United States before coming to Canada in 1881 to become general manager of the fledgling Canadian Pacific Railway. Van Horne pushed through construction of the CPR’s transcontinental line and went on to become company president. He also became one of Canada’s foremost financiers and art collectors, capping his career by opening Cuba’s interior with a railway.
Business & Economics

Amassing Power

Author: David Massell

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 312

View: 138

The damming of the Saguenay brought industrialisation on a grand scale to rural Quebec in the form of newsprint and aluminum manufacture. Tapping into rich and diverse sources in Canada, the United States, and Europe, Massell provides an interdisciplinary, cross-border study of American capital and Canadian resources. He shows us how ever-larger amounts of capital yielded increasingly massive and sophisticated applications of hydroelectric technology. Grand industrial plans, in turn, encroached upon provincial water rights and farmers' lands, which drew the attention of the state. He examines the protracted power struggle between public and private interests - between American capitalists and the nascent bureaucracy of the province of Quebec - and describes the origins and evolution of the events that led to state control over hydraulic resources in the province. In doing so he provides vivid portraits of Duke and of Quebec politicians of the period and gives a dramatic account of the protracted battle of wits between Duke's chief engineer, William States Lee, and Quebec's chief of Hydraulic Service, Arthur Amos. Amassing Power speaks to the integration of North American economies, vividly illustrating the process by which American capital drew Canada's resource-rich North into the economic orbit of the United States.
Biography & Autobiography

Dictionary of Canadian Biography

Author: Francess G. Halpenny

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 1305

View: 247

These biographies of Canadians are arranged chronologically by date of death. Entries in each volume are listed alphabetically, with bibliographies of source material and an index to names.
History

Making Vancouver

Author: Robert A.J. McDonald

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 335

View: 931

Making Vancouver explores social relationships in Vancouver from 1863 to 1913. It considers how urbanization structured social boundaries among Burrard Inlet's increasingly large population and is premised on the belief that, in studying social boundaries, historians must abandon single category forms of analysis and build into their research strategies the capacity to explore complexity. Robert McDonald thus traces the relationship between the two forms of identify, class and status, for the whole of Vancouver society. The book starts with the years when settlement on Burrard Inlet centred around two lumber mills, explores periods of elite dominance of city institutions and then of growing social and political conflict following the arrival of the railway, examines the heightening of class tensions at the turn of the century, charts economic growth during the boom years before the war, and concludes with three chapters on the tripartite status hierarchy that emerged in concert with that of a class dichotomy. It reveals a western city that was neither egalitarian nor closed to opportunity. Vancouver up to the pre-war crash of 1913 was open and dynamic. The rapidity of growth, easy access to resources, narrow industrial base, and influence of ethnicity and race softened the thrust towards class division inherent in capitalism. Far more powerful in directing social relations was the quest for status, creating a social structure that was no less hierarchical than that predicted by class theory but much more fluid. The social boundary that separated the working class from others is revealed as a division that for much of the pre-war boom period divided Vancouver society more fundamentally than the boundary separating labour from capital.
History

Civilizing the West

Author: A. A. Den Otter

Publisher: University of Alberta

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 395

View: 409

Alexander Galt and his son Elliott worked tirelessly to promote resource exploitation on Canada's vast western plains. Their coal mines in Alberta gave birth to the city of Lethbridge.
Transportation

Close Ties

Author: Ken Cruikshank

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 287

View: 185

Focusing on the historic controversies surrounding freight rates, Close Ties explores the ways in which Canadians tried to regulate the nation's first big business, the railways. Ken Cruikshank challenges earlier interpretations, concluding that the history of railway regulation in Canada is not a story of powerful business corporations using governments to subvert the people's interests, nor a tale of righteous people overcoming robber barons. Instead, he presents a more complex and engaging account of how governments tried to accommodate the equally selfish demands of divergent and conflicting interests in a competitive economy.
Business & Economics

The CPR

Author: Robert Chodos

Publisher: James Lorimer & Company

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 178

View: 797

This is the amazing story of the most Canadian corporation of them all - the CPR. Born in 1880 with a silver spoon in its mouth - in the form of millions of acres of land, $25 million in cash and some existing railroad track thrown in - the CPR has carri
History

Braddock's Defeat

Author: David L. Preston

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 144

On July 9, 1755, British regulars and American colonial troops under the command of General Edward Braddock, commander in chief of the British Army in North America, were attacked by French and Native American forces shortly after crossing the Monongahela River and while making their way to besiege Fort Duquesne in the Ohio Valley, a few miles from what is now Pittsburgh. The long line of red-coated troops struggled to maintain cohesion and discipline as Indian warriors quickly outflanked them and used the dense cover of the woods to masterful and lethal effect. Within hours, a powerful British army was routed, its commander mortally wounded, and two-thirds of its forces casualties in one the worst disasters in military history. David Preston's gripping and immersive account of Braddock's Defeat, also known as the Battle of the Monongahela, is the most authoritative ever written. Using untapped sources and collections, Preston offers a reinterpretation of Braddock's Expedition in 1754 and 1755, one that does full justice to its remarkable achievements. Braddock had rapidly advanced his army to the cusp of victory, overcoming uncooperative colonial governments and seemingly insurmountable logistical challenges, while managing to carve a road through the formidable Appalachian Mountains. That road would play a major role in America's expansion westward in the years ahead and stand as one of the expedition's most significant legacies. The causes of Braddock's Defeat are debated to this day. Preston's work challenges the stale portrait of an arrogant European officer who refused to adapt to military and political conditions in the New World and the first to show fully how the French and Indian coalition achieved victory through effective diplomacy, tactics, and leadership. New documents reveal that the French Canadian commander, a seasoned veteran named Captain Beaujeu, planned the attack on the British column with great skill, and that his Native allies were more disciplined than the British regulars on the field. Braddock's Defeat establishes beyond question its profoundly pivotal nature for Indian, French Canadian, and British peoples in the eighteenth century. The disaster altered the balance of power in America, and escalated the fighting into a global conflict known as the Seven Years' War. Those who were there, including George Washington, Thomas Gage, Horatio Gates, Charles Lee, and Daniel Morgan, never forgot its lessons, and brought them to bear when they fought again-whether as enemies or allies-two decades hence. The campaign had awakened many British Americans to their provincial status in the empire, spawning ideas of American identity and anticipating the social and political divisions that would erupt in the American Revolution.