Performing Arts

Victorian Pantomime

Author: J. Davis

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 230

View: 188

Featuring contributions by new and established nineteenth-century theatre scholars, this collection of critical essays is the first of its kind devoted solely to Victorian pantomime. It takes us through the various manifestations of British pantomime in the Victorian period and its ambivalent relationship with Victorian values.
Drama

Theatre in the Victorian Age

Author: Michael R Booth

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 218

View: 545

A comprehensive survey of the theatre practice and dramatic literature of the Victorian period.
Performing Arts

The Golden Age of Pantomime

Author: Jeffrey Richards

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 456

View: 835

Of all the theatrical genres most prized by the Victorians, pantomime is the only one to have survived continuously into the twenty-first century. It remains as true today as it was in the 1830s, that a visit to the pantomime constitutes the first theatrical experience of most children and now, as then, a successful pantomime season is the key to the financial health of most theatres. Everyone went to the pantomime, from Queen Victoria and the royal family to the humblest of her subjects. It appealed equally to West End and East End, to London and the provinces, to both sexes and all ages. Many Victorian luminaries were devotees of the pantomime, notably among them John Ruskin, Charles Dickens, Lewis Carroll and W.E. Gladstone. In this vivid and evocative account of the Victorian pantomime, Jeffrey Richards examines the potent combination of slapstick, spectacle and subversion that ensured the enduring popularity of the form. The secret of its success, he argues, was its continual evolution. It acted as an accurate cultural barometer of its times, directly reflecting current attitudes, beliefs and preoccupations, and it kept up a flow of instantly recognisable topical allusions to political rows, fashion fads, technological triumphs, wars and revolutions, and society scandals. Richards assesses throughout the contribution of writers, producers, designers and stars to the success of the pantomime in its golden age. This book is a treat as rich and appetizing as turkey, mince pies and plum pudding.
Drama

Aladdin and His Wonderful Lamp

Author: Alan Brown

Publisher: Samuel French

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 78

View: 413

Alan Brown's pantomimes recreate those of Victorian times, blending traditional elements - including Harlequin interludes and suggestions for period songs - with subtle updatings to suit modern young audiences.

Sleeping Beauty

Author: Alan Brown

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 88

View: 541

Alan Brown's pantomimes recreate those of Victorian times, blending traditional elements - including Harlequin interludes and suggestions for period songs- with subtle updatings to suit modern young audiences.
English drama

Prefaces to English Nineteenth-century Theatre

Author: Michael Booth

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: English drama

Page: 231

View: 309

This compilation of the prefaces from the author's "English plays of the nineteenth century" (5 vols. ; London : Oxford Univ. Press, 1969-1976) provides an introduction to the critical interpretations of most genres of English drama.

Dick Whittington

Author: Alan Brown

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 52

View: 344

Alan Brown's pantomimes recreate those of Victorian times, blending traditional elements - including Harlequin interludes and suggestions for period songs - with subtle updatings to suit modern young audiences.
Art

The Victorian Marionette Theatre

Author: John Mccormick

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 272

View: 825

In this fascinating and colorful book, researcher and performer John McCormick focuses on the marionette world of Victorian Britain between its heyday after 1860 and its waning years from 1895 to 1914. Situating the rich and diverse puppet theatre in the context of entertainment culture, he explores both the aesthetics of these dancing dolls and their sociocultural significance in their life and time. The history of marionette performances is interwoven with live-actor performances and with the entire gamut of annual fairs, portable and permanent theatres, music halls, magic lantern shows, waxworks, panoramas, and sideshows. McCormick has drawn upon advertisements in the Era, an entertainment paper, between the 1860s and World War I, and articles in the World’s Fair, a paper for showpeople, in the first fifty years of the twentieth century, as well as interviews with descendants of the marionette showpeople and close examinations of many of the surviving puppets. McCormick begins his study with an exploration of the Victorian marionette theatre in the context of other theatrical events of the day, with proprietors and puppeteers, and with the venues where they performed. He further examines the marionette’s position as an actor not quite human but imitating humans closely enough to be considered empathetic; the ways that physical attributes were created with wood, paint, and cloth; and the dramas and melodramas that the dolls performed. A discussion of the trick figures and specialized acts that each company possessed, as well as an exploration of the theatre’s staging, lighting, and costuming, follows in later chapters. McCormick concludes with a description of the last days of marionette theatre in the wake of changing audience expectations and the increasing popularity of moving pictures. This highly enjoyable and readable study, often illuminated by intriguing anecdotes such as that of the Armenian photographer who fell in love with and abducted the Holden company’s Cinderella marionette in 1881, will appeal to everyone fascinated by the magic of nineteenth-century theatre, many of whom will discover how much the marionette could contribute to that magic.