History

Viking London

Author: Thomas Williams

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 179

London was reborn in the fires of the Viking Age, transformed by immigrants and natives, kings and commoners, warriors and saints.
History

Women in the Viking Age

Author: Judith Jesch

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 239

View: 277

Through runic inscriptions and behind the veil of myth, Jesch discovers the true story of viking women.
Social Science

Crafts and Social Networks in Viking Towns

Author: Stephen P. Ashby

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 237

Crafting Communities explores the interface between craft, communication networks, and urbanization in Viking-age Northern Europe. Viking-period towns were the hubs of cross-cultural communication of their age, and innovations in specialized crafts provide archaeologists with some of the best evidence for studying this communication. The integrated results presented in these papers have been made possible through the sustained collaboration of a group of experts with complementary insights into individual crafts. Results emerge from recent scholarly advances in the study of artifacts and production: first, the application of new analytical techniques in artifact studies (e.g. metallographic, isotopic, and biomolecular techniques) and second, the shifted in interpretative focus of medieval artifact studies from a concern with object function to considerations of processes of production, and of the social agency of technology. Furthermore, the introduction of social network theory and actor-network theory has redirected attention toward the process of communication, and highlighted the significance of material culture in the learning and transmission of cultural knowledge, including technology. The volume brings together leading UK and Scandinavian archaeological specialists to explore crafted products and workshop-assemblages from these towns, in order to clarify how such long-range communication worked in pre-modern Northern Europe. Contributors assess the implications for our understanding of early towns and the long-term societal change catalysed by them, including the initial steps towards commercial economies. Results are analyzed in relation to social network theory, social and economic history, and models of communication, setting an agenda for further research. Crafting Communities provides a landmark statement on our knowledge of Viking-Age craft and communication
Literary Criticism

Dangerous Edges of Graham Greene

Author: Dermot Gilvary

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 140

Informative, broad-ranging, and sheds new light on the life and literary art of one of the last century's most celebrated authors.
History

Ships and Men in the Late Viking Age

Author: Judith Jesch

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 330

View: 479

A critical survey of the vocabulary of Viking ships and their crews, of fleets and sailing and battles at sea, based on the runic and skaldic evidence from c.950-1100, and studied within the context of Viking activity in the period.
History

Viking Age England

Author: Julian D Richards

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 747

Viking Age England
History

The Northmen's Fury

Author: Philip Parker

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 737

The Northmen’s Fury tells the Viking story, from the first pinprick raids of the eighth century to the great armies that left their Scandinavian homelands to conquer larger parts of France, Britain and Ireland. It recounts the epic voyages that took them across the Atlantic to the icy fjords of Greenland and to North America over four centuries before Columbus and east to the great rivers of Russia and the riches of the Byzantine empire. One summer’s day in 793, death arrived from the sea. The raiders who sacked the island monastery of Lindisfarne were the first Vikings, sea-borne attackers who brought two centuries of terror to northern Europe. Before long the sight of their dragon-prowed longships and the very name of Viking gave rise to fear and dread, so much so that monks were reputed to pray each night for delivery from ‘the Northmen’s Fury’. Yet for all their reputation as bloodthirsty warriors, the Vikings possessed a sophisticated culture that produced art of great beauty, literature of abiding power and kingdoms of surprising endurance. The Northmen’s Fury describes how and why a region at the edge of Europe came to dominate and to terrorise much of the rest of the continent for nearly three centuries and how, in the end, the coming of Christianity and the growing power of kings tempered the Viking ferocity and stemmed the tide of raids. It relates the astonishing achievement of the Vikings in forging far-flung empires whose sinews were the sea and whose arteries were not roads but maritime trading routes. The blood of the Vikings runs in millions of veins in Europe and the Americas and the tale of their conquests, explorations and achievements continues to inspire people around the world.
History

The Vikings and Their Age

Author: Angus A. Somerville

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 473

This book, the first in our Companions to Medieval Studies series, is a brief introduction to the history, culture, and religion of the Viking Age and provides an essential foundation for study of the period. The companion begins by defining the Viking Age and explores topics such as Viking society and religion. Viking biographies provide students with information on important figures in Viking lore such as Harald Bluetooth, Eirik the Red, Leif Eiriksson, and Gudrid Thorbjarnardaughter, a female Viking traveler. A compelling chapter entitled "How Do We Know About the Vikings?" and a case study on the wandering monks of St. Philibert introduce students to the process of historical inquiry. The book concludes with a discussion of the impact of the Vikings and their legacy. Pedagogical resources include a detailed chronology, study questions, a glossary, 4 maps, and 14 images. Text boxes provide information on outsider perceptions of the Vikings, a detailed account of a Viking raid, and a description of a chieftain's dwelling in Arctic Norway. This study also benefits from a multi-disciplinary approach including insights and evidence from such diverse disciplines as archaeology, philology, religion, linguistics, and genetics.
Fiction

Paying the Viking's Price

Author: Michelle Styles

Publisher: Harlequin

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 546

ORDERED TO THE VIKING'S BED! Feared warrior Brand Bjornson has finally got what he's striven for—lands of his own, granted to him by his king. But his new estate, Breckon, holds more than a few surprises—not least the intriguingly beautiful Edith, former Lady of Breckon. Proud Edith refuses to abandon her lands to the mercy of Viking invaders, and impressed by her courage, Brand agrees she can stay. He has one condition—that she should become his concubine!
Fiction

British Fiction of the 1990s

Author: Nick Bentley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 133

The 1990s proved to be a particularly rich and fascinating period for British fiction. This book presents a fresh perspective on the diverse writings that appeared over the decade, bringing together leading academics in the field. British Fiction of the 1990s: traces the concerns that emerged as central to 1990s fiction, in sections on millennial anxieties, identity politics, the relationship between the contemporary and the historical, and representations of contemporary space offers distinctive new readings of the most important novelists of the period, including Martin Amis, Beryl Bainbridge, Pat Barker, Julian Barnes, A.S. Byatt, Hanif Kureishi, Ian McEwan, Iain Sinclair, Zadie Smith and Jeanette Winterson shows how British fiction engages with major cultural debates of the time, such as the concern with representing various identities and cultural groups, or theories of ‘the end of history’ discusses 1990s fiction in relation to broader literary and critical theories, including postmodernism, post-feminism and postcolonialism. Together the essays highlight the ways in which the writing of the 1990s represents a development of the themes and styles of the post-war novel generally, yet displays a range of characteristics distinct to the decade.
History

History of Everyday Life in Medieval Scotland

Author: Edward J Cowan

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 914

This book examines the ordinary, routine, daily behaviour, experiences and beliefs of people in Scotland from the earliest times to 1600.
World War, 1939-1945

The Viking Atlas of World War II

Author: John Pimlott

Publisher: Viking Press

ISBN:

Category: World War, 1939-1945

Page: 224

View: 298

An estimated 50 million people perished in World War II. Millions across the globe fled war zones to be replaced by soldiers of all creeds and backgrounds. The war changed the world. As technology raced ahead, this was matched by political change, the final end of old empires and the growth of new superpowers.
History

Blood, Sweat and Arrogance

Author: Gordon Corrigan

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 834

Why the British forces fought so badly in World War II and who was to blame Gordon Corrigan's Mud, Blood and Poppycock overturned the myths that surround the First World War. Now he challenges our assumptions about the Second World War in this brilliant, caustic narrative that exposes just how close Britain came to losing. He reveals how Winston Churchill bears a heavy responsibility for the state of our forces in 1939, and how his interference in military operations caused a string of disasters. The reputations of some of our most famous generals are also overturned: above all, Montgomery, whose post-war stature owes more to his skill with a pen than talent for command. But this is not just a story of personalities. Gordon Corrigan investigates how the British, who had the biggest and best army in the world in 1918, managed to forget everything they had learned in just twenty years. The British invented the tank, but in 1940 it was the Germans who showed the world how to use them. After we avoided defeat, but the slimmest of margins, it was a very long haul to defeat Hitler's army, and one in which the Russians would ultimately bear the heaviest burden.
Literary Criticism

Novelists in the New Millennium

Author: Vanessa Guignery

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 176

View: 865

A collection of interviews with leading writers such as Julian Barnes, Jonathan Coe, Kazuo Ishiguro, Hanif Kureishi, Arundhati Roy and Will Self. Through these interviews the book explores and introduces a range of key themes in contemporary literature, raising questions about genre, history, postmodernism, celebrity culture and form.
History

Carolingian Coinage and the Vikings

Author: Simon Coupland

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 907

This volume brings together for the first time Simon Coupland's series of significant articles on Carolingian coinage. The author draws out the economic and political implications of coin types and coin hoards from the reign of Charlemagne to the Edict of Pîtres in 864. This numismatic survey is complemented by other studies which use the evidence of coinage and contemporary texts to consider aspects of trade and power in the ninth century, particularly the impact of the Viking raids.
Literary Criticism

The Fiction of Pat Barker

Author: Merritt Moseley

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 184

View: 451

Pat Barker is one of the most important authors of her time. Her fiction has won many awards – including the Booker Prize for The Ghost Road, the last novel in her celebrated Regeneration trilogy – and has attracted much critical attention. This stimulating Guide examines the key critical responses to the full range of Barker's fiction, from newspaper reviews and journal articles to revealing interviews and book-length scholarship. Merritt Moseley also explores the central themes which run through Barker's novels and the criticism, such as the issues of gender, class, social realism, violence and trauma. Tracing the development of Barker's fiction through the surrounding critical works, this is an indispensable volume for anyone with an interest in one of Britain's most popular and widely-studied contemporary writers.
Fiction

Taming His Viking Woman

Author: Michelle Styles

Publisher: Harlequin

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 664

The sea-king's warrior bride Legendary shield maiden Sayrid Avildottar will marry no man unless he first defeats her in combat. And in powerful sea-king Hrolf Eymundsson she has finally met her match. Hrolf may have won her lands—and her body—but can Sayrid welcome a stranger to her bed? The world of fighting is all she knows! With a husband intent on seducing his new bride, perhaps, just this once, Sayrid will discover that surrender can bring the greatest pleasure of all… "Maintains the myth while adding sexual tension, nonstop action and spice." —RT Book Reviews on The Viking's Captive Princess
Art

Viking Art

Author: David Mackenzie Wilson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 173

View: 732

Literary Criticism

The Real Middle Earth

Author: Brian Bates

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 320

View: 330

J.R.R. Tolkien claimed that he based the land of Middle Earth on a real place. The Real Middle Earth brings alive, for the first time, the very real civilization in which those who lived had a vision of life animated by beings beyond the material world. Magic was real to these people and they believed their universe was held together by an interlaced web of golden threads visible only to wizards. At its center was Middle Earth, a place peopled by humans, but imbued with spiritual power. It was a real realm that stretched from Old England to Scandinavia and across to western Europe, encompassing Celts, Anglo Saxons and Vikings. Looking first at the rich and varied tribes who made up the populace of this mystical land, Bates looks at how the people lived their daily lives in a world of magic and mystery. Using archaeological, historical, and psychological research, Brian Bates breathes life into this civilization of two thousand years ago in a book that every Tolkien fan will want.