Social Science

Violence, Prejudice and Sexuality

Author: Stephen Tomsen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 204

View: 589

The binary model of sexuality can be devastating and even fatal for people left outside the category of heterosexuality. Essentialist categories of sexuality and gender are often enforced by harassment and violence, as is clear in the case of violence directed against sexual minorities such as homosexual men. This book investigates why men launch assaults on sexual minorities, why these attacks are so vicious and frequently irrational, the identities of perpetrators and their victims, and why such violence seems to have some acceptance in fields such as law, psychiatry, the media and popular opinion. Tomsen discusses the theoretical and research literatures on models of understanding human sexuality and gender and the nature of hate violence and prejudice in contemporary societies, and also provides an analysis from his own original research to draw out the contradictory nature of both sexual identity and violence and the significance of viewing both fields as linked domains. This text makes an important contribution to current and future discussions of the nature of social prejudice and its ties to legal rulings, collective beliefs and mainstream culture.
Social Science

Queering Criminology

Author: Matthew Ball

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 252

View: 166

Queer criminological work is at the forefront of critical academic criminology, responding to the exclusion of queer communities from criminology, and the injustices that they experience through the criminal justice system. This volume draws together both theoretical and empirical contributions that develop the growing scholarship being produced at the intersection of 'queer' and 'criminology'. Reflecting the diversity of research that is undertaken at this intersection, the contributions to this volume offer a deeper theoretical and conceptual development of this field alongside empirical research that illustrates the continued relevance and urgency of such scholarship. The contributions consider what it means to be queering criminology in the current political, social, and criminological climate, and chart directions along which this field might develop in order to ensure that greater social and criminal justice for LGBTIQ communities is achieved.
Social Science

Women and Heroin Addiction in China's Changing Society

Author: Huan Gao

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 202

View: 677

Accompanying China’s economic reform and open-door policy in 1978, illicit drug use emerged in the late 1980s, and gradually developed into a serious social problem. Heroin was the dominant illicit drug consumed in the new drug epidemic, and the number of female heroin users has increased rapidly in the country. While heroin use in China is soaring, little is known about women’s heroin use in the context of China’s rapidly changing society. Using intensive interviews with 131 female heroin users, this book explores the careers of female heroin users in China under changing social contexts in the reform era. It investigates the impacts of sociological and individual factors on women’s heroin use in each developing stage of their drug use careers. It also examines the social consequences of women’s heroin use by looking at connections between women’s heroin use and criminality, and the change in women’s social relations after heroin use. Lastly, the book analyzes and ascertains the impact of current narcotics control policies on women’s drug use careers. This groundbreaking book has important policy implications for both China and the international society in the context of increasing global concern about women’s substance abuse.
Social Science

American Smuggling as White Collar Crime

Author: Lawrence Karson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 220

View: 128

When Edwin Sutherland introduced the concept of white-collar crime, he referred to the respectable businessmen of his day who had, in the course of their occupations, violated the law whenever it was advantageous to do so. Yet since the founding of the American Republic, numerous otherwise respectable individuals had been involved in white-collar criminality. Using organized smuggling as an exemplar, this narrative history of American smuggling establishes that white-collar crime has always been an integral part of American history when conditions were favorable to violating the law. This dark side of the American Dream originally exposed itself in colonial times with elite merchants of communities such as Boston trafficking contraband into the colonies. It again came to the forefront during the Embargo of 1809 and continued through the War of 1812, the Civil War, nineteenth century filibustering, the Mexican Revolution and Prohibition. The author also shows that the years of illegal opium trade with China by American merchants served as precursor to the later smuggling of opium into the United States. The author confirms that each period of smuggling was a link in the continuing chain of white-collar crime in the 150 years prior to Sutherland’s assertion of corporate criminality.
Social Science

Social Scientists Meet the Media

Author: Alan Bryman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 238

"Part chronicle, part analysis and part advice manual, Social Scientists Meets the Media combines the thoughts of academics and media people to produce a vivid and valuable series of accounts that will prove of service to all academics seeking a wider audience but wary of the terra incognita they face in finding one" Ellis Cashmore, Staffordshire University Social Scientists know they are in a dilemma: their work may fall prey to sensationalism, but at the same time they don't want to be overlooked. Social Scientists Meet the Media collects the experiences of academics who have sought to publicize their research. It contains personal accounts from social scientists with extensive media contact and representatives from radio, television and the press. Based on these often humorous and sometimes chastening accounts, the editors suggest ways to achieve a more fruitful relationship between social scientists and the media.