Business & Economics

Visions of the Press in Britain, 1850-1950

Author: Mark Hampton

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 218

View: 589

Historians recognize the cultural centrality of the newspaper press in Britain, yet very little has been published regarding competing conceptions of the press and its proper role in British society. In Visions of the Press in Britain, 1850-1950, Mark Hampton surveys a diversity of sources--Parliamentary speeches and commissions, books, pamphlets, periodicals and select private correspondence--in order to identify how governmental elites, the educated public, professional journalists, and industry moguls characterized the political and cultural function of the press. Hampton demonstrates that British theories of the press were intimately tied to definitions of the public and the emergence of mass democracy in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
History

Anglo-American Media Interactions, 1850-2000

Author: Joel H. Wiener

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 309

View: 119

This volume reveals the complicated ways in which British and American media have influenced each other over the past two centuries. In doing so, it adds an important transatlantic dimension to media scholarship, while demonstrating the crucial and varied ways in which media have helped build an Anglo-American 'special relationship'.
Social Science

The Routledge Companion to British Media History

Author: Martin Conboy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 628

View: 426

The Routledge Companion to British Media History provides a comprehensive exploration of how different media have evolved within social, regional and national contexts. The 50 chapters in this volume, written by an outstanding team of internationally respected scholars, bring together current debates and issues within media history in this era of rapid change, and also provide students and researchers with an essential collection of comparable media histories. The Routledge Companion to British Media History provides an essential guide to key ideas, issues, concepts and debates in the field. Chapter 40 of this book is freely available as a downloadable Open Access PDF under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 3.0 license. https://www.routledgehandbooks.com/doi/10.4324/9781315756202.ch40
Literary Criticism

G.W.M. Reynolds

Author: Anne Humpherys

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 314

View: 788

G.W.M. Reynolds (1814-1879) had a major impact on the mid-Victorian era that until now has been largely unacknowledged. A prolific novelist whose work had a massive circulation, and an influential journalist and editor, he was a man of contradictions in both his life and writing: a middle-class figure who devoted his life to working class issues but seldom missed a chance to profit from the exploitation of current issues; the founder of the radical newspaper Reynolds Weekly, as well as a bestselling author of historical romances, gothic and sensation novels, oriental tales, and domestic fiction; a perennial bankrupt who nevertheless ended his life prosperously. A figure of such diversity requires a collaborative study. Bringing together a distinguished group of scholars, this volume does justice to the full range of Reynolds's achievement and influence. With proper emphasis on new work in the field, the contributors take on Reynolds's involvement with Chartism, serial publication, the mass market periodical, commodity culture, and the introduction of French literature into British consciousness, to name just a few of the topics covered. The Mysteries of London, the century's most widely read serial, receives the extensive treatment this long-running urban gothic work deserves. Adding to the volume's usefulness are comprehensive bibliographies of Reynolds's own writings and secondary criticism relevant to the study of this central figure in mid-nineteenth-century Britain.
Literary Criticism

Imperial Culture and the Sudan

Author: Lia Paradis

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 499

General Gordon's death in the Sudan marks the height of imperial cultural fever. Even in the late nineteen seventies, the themes of Khartoum were still the basis for children's stories, comic books, and depictions of masculinity.Imperial Culture in the Sudan seeks to examine the cultural impact of Sudan on the popular image of the British empire – why were these colonial administrators characterized as 'adventurers'? Why was Sudan and the story of General Gordon so popular? The author argues it coincided with the mass production of popular journalism, the height of Jingoism as a cultural product and therefore a study of Sudan's experience tells us a lot about the British Empire – how it was made, consumed and remembered.
History

Framing China

Author: Ariane Knüsel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 856

Framing China sheds new light on Western relations with and perceptions of China in the first half of the twentieth century. In this ground-breaking book, Ariane Knüsel examines how China was portrayed in political debates and the media in Britain, the USA and Switzerland between 1900 and 1950. By focusing on the political, economic, cultural and social context that led to the construction of the particular images of China in each country, the author demonstrates that national interests, anxieties and issues influenced the way China was framed and resulted in different portrayals of China in each country. The author’s meticulous analysis of a vast amount of newspaper and magazine articles, commentaries, editorials, cartoons and newsreels that have previously not been studied before also focuses on the transnational circulation of images of China. While previous publications have dealt with the occurrence of the Yellow Peril and Red Menace in particular countries, Framing China reveals that these images were interpreted differently in every nation because they both reflected and contributed to the discursive construction of nationhood in each country and were influenced by domestic issues, cultural values, pre-existing stereotypes, pressure groups and geopolitical aspirations.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Narrating Media History

Author: Michael Bailey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 306

View: 735

Based on the work of media historian, James Curran, Narrating Media History explores British media history as a series of competing narratives. This unique and timely collection brings together leading international media history scholars, not only to identify and contrast the various interrelationships between media histories, but also to encourage dialogue between different historical, political, and theoretical perspectives including: liberalism, feminism, populism, nationalism, libertarianism, radicalism and technological determinism. Essays by distinguished academics cover television, radio, newspaper press and advertising (among others) and illustrate the particularities, affinities, strengths and weaknesses within media history. Each section includes a brief introduction by the editor, with discussion topics and suggestions for further reading, making this an invaluable guide for students of media history.
History

Media and the British Empire

Author: C. Kaul

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 896

'The only true history of a country', wrote Thomas Macaulay, 'is to be found in its newspapers'. This book explores how the media shaped and defined the economic, social, political and cultural dynamics of the British Empire by viewing it from the perspective of the colonised as well as the colonisers.
History

War Commemoration and Civic Culture in the North East of England, 1854–1914

Author: Guy Hinton

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 291

View: 331

This book examines a diverse set of civic war memorials in North East England commemorating three clusters of conflicts: the Crimean War and Indian Rebellion in the 1850s; the ‘small wars’ of the 1880s; and the Boer War from 1899 to 1902. Encompassing a protracted timeframe and embracing disparate social, political and cultural contexts, it analyses how and why war memorials and commemorative practices changed during this key period of social transition and imperial expansion. In assessing the motivations of the memorial organisers and the narratives they sought to convey, the author argues that developments in war commemoration were primarily influenced by – and reflected – broader socio-economic and political transformations occurring in nineteenth-century and early-twentieth century Britain.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Newsworkers

Author: Henrik Örnebring

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 272

View: 444

The last decade has seen a transformation of journalism industries and the working lives of our journalists. Do the changes have the same impact everywhere? Do journalists today experience these changes as a pressure or as a possibility? Is something irrevocably lost from journalism with these changes? Newsworkers takes a broad range of European countries - North and South, East and West, big and small - comparing in each how journalism as work has been affected by the changes in journalism institutions. The book looks at three pertinent and topical questions: the role of technology in changing journalism work practice; the decline or not of professional values; and whether journalism is becoming more homogenous across national borders. Drawing on extensive and original research, the book provides a comprehensive picture of contemporary European journalism.