Juvenile Nonfiction

The War in Afghanistan

Author: Raymond H. Miller

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 112

View: 868

Chronicles the causes, events, and people involved in the Afghan War and the War on Terrorism.
Afghan War, 2001-

Understanding War in Afghanistan

Author: Joseph J. Collins

Publisher: NDU Press

ISBN:

Category: Afghan War, 2001-

Page: 137

View: 551

Provides military leaders, civil servants, diplomats, and students with the intellectual basis that they need to begin to prepare for further study of or an assignment in Afghanistan. This book analyzes the land and its people, recaps Afghan history, and assesses the current situation. It also examines the range of choices for future U.S. policy toward Afghanistan.
Juvenile Nonfiction

You Choose: War in Afghanistan

Author: Matthew John Doeden

Publisher: Capstone

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 112

View: 711

The war in Afghanistan is the longest war the United States has ever fought. It's a tough war against a loosely organized and unpredictable enemy. How will you defend your country? Will you: Serve on an Army Ranger rescue team during the Battle of Takur Ghar? Protect a supply convoy as a member of the National Guard? Fight as a Marine aiding the Army Special Forces during Operation Moshtarak? Everything in this book happened to real people. And YOU CHOOSE what you do next. The choices you make could lead you to survival or to death.
History

9/11 and the Wars in Afghanistan and Iraq

Author: Tom Lansford

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 349

View: 269

• Provides insightful quotes from contemporary figures and primary documents ranging from Osama bin Laden's 1998 fatwa against the United States to the 2006 Iraq Study Group Report • Contains 12 biographies ranging from Osama bin Laden to George W. Bush that provide detailed background on important figures from the era • Presents a chronology of events from the 1970s to the present day, including occurrences leading to the September 11, 2001, attacks and the Iraq War • Includes a select bibliography of major works on the September 11, 2001, attacks; the war in Iraq; homeland security; and the war on terror • Contains a detailed glossary of key terms such as "Shiite" and "weapons of mass destruction"
History

Empire's Ally

Author: Jerome Klassen

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 447

View: 935

The war in Afghanistan has been a major policy commitment and central undertaking of the Canadian state since 2001: Canada has been a leading force in the war, and has spent hundreds of millions of dollars on aid and reconstruction. After a decade of conflict, however, there is considerable debate about the efficacy of the mission, as well as calls to reassess Canada's role in the conflict. An authoritative and strongly analytical work, Empire's Ally provides a much-needed critical investigation into one of the most polarizing events of our time. This collection draws on new primary evidence – including government documents, think tank and NGO reports, international media files, and interviews in Afghanistan – to provide context for Canadian foreign policy, to offer critical perspectives on the war itself, and to link the conflict to broader issues of political economy, international relations, and Canada's role on the world stage. Spanning academic and public debates, Empire's Ally opens a new line of argument on why the mission has entered a stage of crisis.
History

From Kabul to Baghdad and Back

Author: John Ballard

Publisher: Naval Institute Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 959

These experts in the field challenge commonly held views about the success of the global war on terrorism and its campaign in Afghanistan. Their book questions some fundamentals of the population-centric COIN doctrine currently in vogue and harshly criticizes key decisions about the prosecution of the Afghan war. It is the only book to compare the campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan from a national strategic perspective. It questions several key operational factors in Afghanistan, including the decision to give NATO the lead, the performance of both civilian and military leaders, and the prosecution of an Iraq War-style surge. It also contrasts the counterinsurgency campaign styles and the leadership of senior American officials in both Iraq and Afghanistan. A final chapter outlines key lessons of the two campaigns.
Social Science

Organizations at War in Afghanistan and Beyond

Author: Abdulkader H. Sinno

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 260

"After we had exchanged the requisite formalities over tea in his camp on the southern edge of Kabul's outer defense perimeter, the Afghan field commander told me that two of his bravest mujahideen were martyred because he did not have a pickup truck to take them to a Peshawar hospital. They had succumbed to their battle wounds. He asked me to tell his party's bureaucrats across the border that he needed such a vehicle desperately. I double-checked with my interpreter that he was indeed making this request. I wasn't puzzled because the request appeared unreasonable but because he was asking me, a twenty-year-old employee of a humanitarian organization, to intercede on his behalf with his own organization's bureaucracy. I understood on this dry summer day in Khurd Kabul that not all militant and political organizations are alike."—from Organizations at War in Afghanistan and Beyond While popular accounts of warfare, particularly of nontraditional conflicts such as guerrilla wars and insurgencies, favor the roles of leaders or ideology, social-scientific analyses of these wars focus on aggregate categories such as ethnic groups, religious affiliations, socioeconomic classes, or civilizations. Challenging these constructions, Abdulkader H. Sinno closely examines the fortunes of the various factions in Afghanistan, including the mujahideen and the Taliban, that have been fighting each other and foreign armies since the 1979 Soviet invasion. Focusing on the organization of the combatants, Sinno offers a new understanding of the course and outcome of such conflicts. Employing a wide range of sources, including his own fieldwork in Afghanistan and statistical data on conflicts across the region, Sinno contends that in Afghanistan, the groups that have outperformed and outlasted their opponents have done so because of their successful organization. Each organization's ability to mobilize effectively, execute strategy, coordinate efforts, manage disunity, and process information depends on how well its structure matches its ability to keep its rivals at bay. Centralized organizations, Sinno finds, are generally more effective than noncentralized ones, but noncentralized ones are more resilient absent a safe haven. Sinno's organizational theory explains otherwise puzzling behavior found in group conflicts: the longevity of unpopular regimes, the demise of popular movements, and efforts of those who share a common cause to undermine their ideological or ethnic kin. The author argues that the organizational theory applies not only to Afghanistan-where he doubts the effectiveness of American state-building efforts—but also to other ethnic, revolutionary, independence, and secessionist conflicts in North Africa, the Middle East, and beyond.
Fiction

The Black Tulip

Author: Milton Bearden

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 336

View: 228

“In this suspense-filled thriller, the man who ran the closing phases of the Afghan war for the Agency takes his readers on a stunning voyage of discovery through that clandestine world, from Kabul to Hong Kong and the Moscow of the Evil Empire.”—Larry Collins, co-author of Is Paris Burning? Set in the treacherous mountains of Afghanistan and the equally hazardous headquarters of the CIA Operations Directorate in Washington, The Black Tulip is a fast-paced thriller, based on real events, by the legendary spy who masterminded the plot to arm Afghan freedom fighters in their holy war against the Soviets. A longtime veteran of the CIA, Bearden knows the tricks of the trade, the price of honor, the bonds of blood, and the enduring lure of retribution. Praise for The Black Tulip “An irresistible page-turner . . . especially vivid because we know the author was a witness to events.”—The Wall Street Journal “Milt Bearden really delivers. With thirty years in the CIA to back it up, he knows what he’s talking about. . . . A terrific book.”—Robert De Niro “A heart-stopping tale of espionage and betrayal. Forget Tom Clancy: this is the real thing.”—Richard Holbrooke “A truly engrossing espionage read . . . Bearden explains how the CIA supplied Afghan guerrillas with the hardware—rockets, Stinger surface-to-air missiles, and night-vision equipment—which enabled them to chew a vastly stronger Soviet force to bloody ribbons. . . . Highly recommended.”—The Washington Times
History

How We Won and Lost the War in Afghanistan

Author: Douglas Grindle

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 311

Douglas Grindle provides a firsthand account of how the war in Afghanistan was won in a rural district south of Kandahar City and how the newly created peace slipped away when vital resources failed to materialize and the United States headed for the exit. By placing the reader at the heart of the American counterinsurgency effort, Grindle reveals little-known incidents, including the failure of expensive aid programs to target local needs, the slow throttling of local government as official funds failed to reach the districts, and the United States’ inexplicable failure to empower the Afghan local officials even after they succeeded in bringing the people onto their side. Grindle presents the side of the hard-working Afghans who won the war and expresses what they really thought of the U.S. military and its decisions. Written by a former field officer for the U.S. Agency for International Development, this story of dashed hopes and missed opportunities details how America’s desire to leave the war behind ultimately overshadowed its desire to sustain victory.
Afghan War, 2001-

The Good War

Author: Jack Fairweather

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Afghan War, 2001-

Page: 528

View: 843

In its earliest days, the American-led war in Afghanistan appeared to be a triumph - a âe~good warâe(tm) in comparison to the debacle in Iraq. It has since turned into one of the longest and most expensive wars in recent history. The story of how this good war went so bad may well turn out to be a defining tragedy of the twenty-first century - yet, as acclaimed war correspondent Jack Fairweather explains, it should also give us reason to hope for an outcome grounded in Afghan reality. In The Good War, Fairweather provides the first full narrative history of the war in Afghanistan, from the 2001 invasion to the 2014 withdrawal. Drawing on hundreds of interviews, previously unpublished archives, and months of experience living and reporting in Afghanistan, Fairweather traces the course of the conflict from its inception after 9/11 to the drawdown in 2014. In the process, he explores the righteous intentions and astounding hubris that caused the Westâe(tm)s strategy in Afghanistan to flounder, refuting the long-held notion that the war could have been won with more troops and cash. Fairweather argues that only by accepting the limitations in Afghanistan - from the presence of the Taliban to the ubiquity of poppy production to the countryâe(tm)s inherent unsuitability for rapid, Western-style development - can we help to restore peace in this shattered land. A timely lesson in the perils of nation-building and a sobering reminder of the limits of military power, The Good War leads readers from the White House Situation Room to Afghan military outposts, from warlordsâe(tm) palaces to insurgentsâe(tm) dens, to explain how the US and its British allies might have salvaged the Afghan campaign - and how we must rethink other âe~goodâe(tm) wars in the future.
History

The Routledge Handbook of War and Society

Author: Steven Carlton-Ford

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 726

"[This book] provides readers with a set of unique perspectives on two major wars: the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Most handbooks are written in retrospect, summarizing long-term trends in research. In contrast, the chapters in ... [this book] have all been written while the wars were being fought; each chapter provides a distinct angle on the wars and society as they continue to evolve ... the chapters provide some of the first empirical social and behavioral science research on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan"--Introd. Managing humanitarian information in Iraq -- Role of contractors and other non-military personnel in today's wars -- Evaluating psychological operations in Operation Enduring Freedom -- Armed conflict and health : cholera in Iraq -- Iraqi adolescents : self-regard, self-derogation, and perceived threat in war -- pt. 3. The war back home : the social construction of war, its heroes, and its enemies. Globalization and the Invasion of Iraq : state power and the enforcement of Neoliberalism -- The Pakistan and Afghan crisis -- Mass media as risk-management in the "War on Terror"--Talking war : how elite US newspaper editorials and opinion pieces debated the attack on Iraq -- Debating anti-war protests : the microlevel discourse of social movement framing on a University Listserv -- Making heroes : an attributional perspective -- Making the Muslim enemy : the social construction of the enemy in the War on Terror -- pt. 4. The war back home : families and young people on the home front. Greedy media : army families, embedded reporting, and war in Iraq -- Military child well-being in the face of multiple deployments -- American undergraduate attitudes toward the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan : trends and variations.
History

The Arabs at War in Afghanistan

Author: Mustafa Hamid

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 355

View: 674

A former senior mujahidin figure and an ex-counter-terrorism analyst cooperating to write a book on the history and legacy of Arab-Afghan fighters in Afghanistan is a remarkable and improbable undertaking. Yet this is what Mustafa Hamid, aka Abu Walid al-Masri, and Leah Farrall have achieved with the publication of their ground-breaking work. The result of thousands of hours of discussions over several years, The Arabs at War in Afghanistan offers significant new insights into the history of many of today's militant Salafi groups and movements. By revealing the real origins of the Taliban and al-Qaeda and the jostling among the various jihadi groups, this account not only challenges conventional wisdom, but also raises uncomfortable questions as to how events from this important period have been so badly misconstrued.
History

Afghanistan

Author: Bahaudin Mujtaba

Publisher: Ilead Academy

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 295

The author provides a realistic and personal paradigm of what has happened in Afghanistan in the last three decades, starting with the invasion of the country by the Russian forces and continuing through what is happening now. He also shares the story of his family's escape from the country.
Social Science

Outside the Wire

Author: Kevin Patterson

Publisher: Vintage Canada

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 481

A remarkable collection of first-hand accounts written by soldiers, doctors and aid workers on the front lines of Canada’s war in Afghanistan. Visceral, intimate and captivating in ways no other telling could be, Outside the Wire features nearly two dozen stories by Canadians on the front lines in Afghanistan, including the previously unpublished letters home of Captain Nichola Goddard, the first female NATO soldier killed in combat, and an introductory reflection by Roméo Dallaire. Collected here are stories of battle and the more subtle engagements of this little-understood war: the tearful farewells; the shock of immersion into a culture that has been at war for thirty years; looking a suicide bomber in the eye the moment before he strikes; grappling with mortality in the Kandahar Field Hospital; and the unexpected humour that leavens life in a warzone. Throughout each piece the passion of those engaged in rebuilding this shattered country shines through, a glimmer of optimism and determination so rare in multinational military actions–and so particularly Canadian. In Outside the Wire, award-winning author Kevin Patterson and co-editor Jane Warren have rediscovered the valour and horror of sacrifice in this, the definitive account of the modern Canadian experience of war.

Soviet War in Afghanistan

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 32

View: 303

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 31. Chapters: Mujahideen, Civil war in Afghanistan, List of Soviet aircraft losses in Afghanistan, CIA-Osama bin Laden controversy, Badaber Uprising, White Tights, Makhtab al-Khidmat, Soviet troop withdrawal from Afghanistan, Peshawar Air Station, Sharafat Kuh Front, Dawa'a al-Jihad. Excerpt: The Soviet war in Afghanistan was a nine-year conflict involving the Soviet Union, supporting the Marxist-Leninist government of the Democratic Republic of Afghanistan against the Afghan Mujahideen and foreign "Arab-Afghan" volunteers. The mujahideen found military and financial support from a variety of sources including the United States, Saudi Arabia, the United Kingdom, Pakistan, Egypt, China and other nations. The Afghan war became a proxy war in the broader context of the late Cold War. The initial Soviet deployment of the 40th Army in Afghanistan began on December 24, 1979 under Soviet premier Leonid Brezhnev. The final troop withdrawal started on May 15, 1988, and ended on February 15, 1989 under the last Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. Due to the interminable nature of the war, the conflict in Afghanistan has sometimes been referred to as the "Soviet Union's Vietnam War." The Democratic Republic of Afghanistan was formed after the Saur Revolution on 27 April 1978. The government was one with a pro-poor, pro-farmer and socialistic agenda. It had close relations with the Soviet Union. On 5 December 1978 a friendship treaty was signed with the Soviet Union. On July 3, 1979 United States President Jimmy Carter signed the first directive for secret aid to the opponents of the pro-Soviet regime in Kabul. The aim of the U.S. was to drag the Soviet Union into the "Afghan trap" as U.S. National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski termed it. Russian military involvement in Afghanistan has a long history, going back to Tsarist expansions...
History

Understanding the U.S. Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan

Author: Beth Bailey

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 668

Choice Outstanding Academic Title of 2016 Investigates the causes, conduct, and consequences of the recent American wars in Iraq and Afghanistan Understanding the United States’ wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is essential to understanding the United States in the first decade of the new millennium and beyond. These wars were pivotal to American foreign policy and international relations. They were expensive: in lives, in treasure, and in reputation. They raised critical ethical and legal questions; they provoked debates over policy, strategy, and war-planning; they helped to shape American domestic politics. And they highlighted a profound division among the American people: While more than two million Americans served in Iraq and Afghanistan, many in multiple deployments, the vast majority of Americans and their families remained untouched by and frequently barely aware of the wars conducted in their name, far from American shores, in regions about which they know little. Understanding the U.S. Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan gives us the first book-length expert historical analysis of these wars. It shows us how they began, what they teach us about the limits of the American military and diplomacy, and who fought them. It examines the lessons and legacies of wars whose outcomes may not be clear for decades. In 1945 few Americans could imagine that the country would be locked in a Cold War with the Soviet Union for decades; fewer could imagine how history would paint the era. Understanding the U.S. Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan begins to come to grips with the period when America became enmeshed in a succession of “low intensity” conflicts in the Middle East.
Afghan War, 2001-

Fool's Errand

Author: Scott Horton

Publisher: The Libertarian Institute

ISBN:

Category: Afghan War, 2001-

Page: 316

View: 745

"After more than a decade and a half, the results are in. The U.S. government has been unable to achieve its goals in Afghanistan. Even worse, what state it has been able to achieve there is completely unsustainable and certain to fall apart when the occupation is finally called off, and America does come home. The politicans, generals, and intelligence officers behind this unending catastrophe, who always promise they can fix these problems with just a little bit more time, money and military force, have lost all credibility. The truth is America's Afghan war is an irredeemable disaster. It was meant to be a trap in the first place. America is not only failing to defeat its enemies, but is destroying itself, just as Osama bin Laden and al Qaeda always intended. Fool's Errand is an attempt to present the American people with the reality of this forgotten war, because only the ignorance of pride and refusal to admit they have been deceived can prevent Americans from realizing they have supported a policy that is destructive to the United States as well as Afghanistan." -- from Introduction.
History

The Soviet-Afghan War

Author: Russia (Federation). Generalʹnyĭ shtab

Publisher: Modern War Studies (Paperback)

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 238

A critical examination of the Soviet military's role in the 1979-1989 War in Afghanistan presents the Russian view of how the war occurred while chronicling its major battles and operations and offering insight into Soviet tactics and strategy. Simultaneous.