History

White Women Captives in North Africa

Author: K. Bekkaoui

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 303

View: 104

A fascinating anthology of narratives from the period 1735-1830, by European women who recount their enslavement in North Africa. The first such collection, it includes an extensive introduction which links the discourse on contemporary Western women captives in Iran, Afghanistan and Iraq with that of former white captives in North Africa.
Biography & Autobiography

White Slaves, African Masters

Author: Paul Baepler

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 310

View: 821

IntroductionCotton Mather: The Glory of GoodnessJohn D. Foss: A Journal, of the Captivity and Sufferings of John FossJames Leander Cathcart: The Captives, Eleven Years in AlgiersMaria Martin: History of the Captivity and Sufferings of Mrs. Maria MartinJonathan Cowdery: American Captives in TripoliWilliam Ray: Horrors of SlaveryRobert Adams: The Narrative of Robert AdamsEliza Bradley: An Authentic NarrativeIon H. Perdicaris: In Raissuli's HandsAppendix: Publishing History of the American Barbary Captive Narrative Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.
History

Captives and Corsairs

Author: Gillian Weiss

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 389

View: 697

French response to the capture and enslavement of French citizens and subjects by Muslim corsairs in the Mediterranean.
History

British Captives from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic, 1563-1760

Author: Nabil Matar

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 350

View: 912

In British Captives from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic, 1563-1760, Nabil Matar furnishes a list of the names of all captives in the British archive and presents a chronological study of the historical and social background of British captivity.
History

The Making of the Modern Mediterranean

Author:

Publisher: University of California Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 932

Studies of the pivotal historic place of the Mediterranean have long been dominated by specialists of its northern shores, that is, by European historians. The seven leading authors in this groundbreaking volume challenge views of Mediterranean space as shaped by European trajectories, and in doing so, they challenge our comfortable notions. Drawing perspectives from the Mediterranean’s eastern and southern shores, they ask anew: What is the Mediterranean? What are its borders, its defining characteristics? What forces of nature, politics, culture, or economics have made the Mediterranean, and how long have they or will they endure? Covering the sixteenth century to the twentieth, this timely volume brings the early modern world into conversation with the modern world in new ways, demonstrating that only recently can we differentiate the north and south into separate cultural and political zones. The Making of the Modern Mediterranean: Views from the South offers a blueprint for a new generation of readers to rethink the world we thought we knew.
Literary Criticism

Mediterranean Slavery and World Literature

Author: Mario Klarer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 948

Mediterranean Slavery and World Literature is a collection of selected essays about the transformations of captivity experiences in major early modern texts of world literature and popular media, including works by Cervantes, de Vega, Defoe, Rousseau, and Mozart. Where most studies of Mediterranean slavery, until now, have been limited to historical and autobiographical accounts, this volume looks specifically at literary adaptations from a multicultural perspective.
History

Mediterranean Captivity through Arab Eyes, 1517-1798

Author: Nabil Matar

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 306

View: 248

Mediterranean Captivity through Arab Eyes, 1517-1798 is the first book that examines the Arabic captivity narratives in the early modern period. Based on Arabic sources in archives stretching from Amman to Fez to London and Rome, Matar presents the story of captivity from the perspective of the Arabic-speaking captives who have not been examined in the growing field of captivity studies.
History

Piracy and Captivity in the Mediterranean

Author: Mario Klarer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 302

View: 432

Piracy and Captivity in the Mediterranean explores the early modern genre of European Barbary Coast captivity narratives from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century. During this period, the Mediterranean Sea was the setting of large-scale corsairing that resulted in the capture or enslavement of Europeans and Americans by North African pirates, as well as of North Africans by European forces, turning the Barbary Coast into the nemesis of any who went to sea. Through a variety of specifically selected narrative case studies, this book displays the blend of both authentic eye witness accounts and literary fictions that emerged against the backdrop of the tumultuous Mediterranean Sea. A wide range of other primary sources, from letters to ransom lists and newspaper articles to scientific texts, highlights the impact of piracy and captivity across key European regions, including France, Italy, Germany, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Scandinavia, and Britain, as well as the United States and North Africa. Divided into four parts and offering a variety of national and cultural vantage points, Piracy and Captivity in the Mediterranean addresses both the background from which captivity narratives were born and the narratives themselves. It is essential reading for scholars and students of early modern slavery and piracy.
Business & Economics

Consuls and the Institutions of Global Capitalism, 1783–1914

Author: Ferry de Goey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 240

View: 933

The nineteenth century saw the expansion of Western influence across the globe. A consular presence in a new territory had numerous advantages for business and trade. Using specific case studies, de Goey demonstrates the key role played by consuls in the rise of the global economy.
History

Britain and the Islamic World, 1558-1713

Author: Gerald MacLean

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 473

Before they had an empire in the East, the British travelled into the Islamic world to pursue trade and to form strategic alliances against the Catholic powers of France and Spain. First-hand encounters with Muslims, Jews, Greek Orthodox, and other religious communities living together under tolerant Islamic rule changed forever the way Britons thought about Islam, just as the goods they imported from Islamic countries changed forever the way they lived. Britain and the Islamic World tells the story of how, for a century and a half, merchants and diplomats travelled from Morocco to Istanbul, from Aleppo to Isfahan, and from Hormuz to Surat, and discovered a world that was more fascinating than fearful. Gerald MacLean and Nabil Matar examine the place of Islam and Muslims in English thought, and how British monarchs dealt with supremely powerful Muslim rulers. They document the importance of diplomatic and mercantile encounters, show how the writings of captives spread unreliable information about Islam and Muslims, and investigate observations by travellers and clergymen who reported meetings with Jews, eastern Christians, Armenians, and Shi'ites. They also trace how trade and the exchange of material goods with the Islamic world shaped how people in Britain lived their lives and thought about themselves.

People and Ideas on the Move

Author: Marija Wakounig

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 165

During the 1970s the todays Austrian Federal Ministry of Education, Science and Research (Bundesministerium für Bildung, Wissenschaft und Forschung, BMBWF) supported the founding of the Center for Austrian Studies at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis and the Austrian Chair at Stanford University in California. These foundings were the initial incentives for the worldwide 'spreading' of similar institutions; currently nine Centers for Austrian and Central European Studies exist in seven states on three continents. The funding of the Ministry enables to connect senior with young scholars, to help young PhD students, to participate and to benefit from the scientific connection of experienced researchers, and to get in touch with the national scientific community by 'sniffing scientific air', as the Austrian like to say. Furthermore, it aims to avoid prejudices, and to spread a better understanding and knowledge about Austria and Central Europe by promoting scientific exchange. This volume contains the annual reports (2017/2018) of the Center Director's and the papers of their PhD students, which discuss various topics on mostly (East-)Central European History from various perspectives and in different centuries.
History

Gender, Mastery and Slavery

Author: William Henry Foster

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 196

View: 178

Gender, family and sexual relations defined human slavery from its classical origins in Europe to the rise and fall of race-based slavery in the Americas. Gender, Mastery and Slavery is one of the first books to explore the importance of men and women to slaveholding across these eras. Foster argues that at the heart of the successive European institutions of slavery at home and in the New World was the volatile question of women's ability to exert mastery. Facing the challenge to play the 'good mother' in public and private, free women from Rome to Muslim North Africa, to the indigenous tribes of North America, to the antebellum plantations of the southern United States found themselves having to economically manage slaves, servants and captives. At the same time, they had to protect their reputations from various forms of attack and themselves from vilification on a number of fronts. With the recurrent cultural wars over the maternal role within slavery touching the worlds of politics, warfare, religion, and colonial and imperial rivalries, this lively comparative survey is essential reading for anyone studying, or simply interested in, this key topic in global and gender history.
Transportation

Women and Children First

Author: Robin Miskolcze

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 220

View: 741

At a crucial time in American history, narratives of women in command or imperiled at sea contributed to the construction of a national rhetoric. Robin Miskolcze makes her case by way of careful readings of images of women at sea before the Civil War in her book Women and Children First. Though the sea has traditionally been interpreted as the province of men, women have gone to sea as mothers, wives, figureheads, and slaves. In fact, in the nineteenth century, women at sea contributed to the formation of an ethics of survival that helped to define American ideals. This study examines, often for the first time, images of women at sea in antebellum narratives ranging from novels and sermons to newspaper accounts and lithographs. Anglo-American women in antebellum sea narratives are often portrayed as models of American ideals derived from women’s seemingly innate Christian self-sacrifice. Miskolcze argues that these ideals, in conjunction with the maritime directive of “women and children first” during sea disasters, in turn defined a new masculine individualism, one that was morally minded, rooted in Christian principles, and dedicated to preserving virtue. Further, Miskolcze contends that without the antebellum sea narratives portraying the Christian self-sacrifice of women, the abolitionist cause would have suffered. African American women appealed to the directive of “women and children first” to make manifest their own womanhood, and by extension, their own humanity.
Religion

Christian-Muslim Relations. A Bibliographical History Volume 16 North America, South-East Asia, China, Japan, and Australasia (1800-1914)

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 844

View: 577

Christian-Muslim Relations. A Bibliographical History 16 is about relations between the two faiths in North America, South-East Asia, China, Japan and Australasia from 1800 to 1914. It gives descriptions, assessments and bibliographical details of all known works from this period.
Art

Recollecting History beyond Borders

Author: Lhoussain Simour

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 240

View: 688

Recollecting History beyond Borders looks closely at the experience of Moroccan captives, acrobats and dancing women in America throughout various historical periods. It explores the mobility of Moroccans beyond borders and their cultural interactions with the American self and civilization, and offers a broad discussion on the negotiation of the complex dynamics of representation and on the various discursive ramifications of the cultural contacts initiated by ordinary Moroccan travellers. I...
History

The Counter-Revolution of 1776

Author: Gerald Horne

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 363

View: 847

The successful 1776 revolt against British rule in North America has been hailed almost universally as a great step forward for humanity. But the Africans then living in the colonies overwhelmingly sided with the British. In this trailblazing book, Gerald Horne shows that in the prelude to 1776, the abolition of slavery seemed all but inevitable in London, delighting Africans as much as it outraged slaveholders, and sparking the colonial revolt. Prior to 1776, anti-slavery sentiments were deepening throughout Britain and in the Caribbean, rebellious Africans were in revolt. For European colonists in America, the major threat to their security was a foreign invasion combined with an insurrection of the enslaved. It was a real and threatening possibility that London would impose abolition throughout the colonies—a possibility the founding fathers feared would bring slave rebellions to their shores. To forestall it, they went to war. The so-called Revolutionary War, Horne writes, was in part a counter-revolution, a conservative movement that the founding fathers fought in order to preserve their right to enslave others. The Counter-Revolution of 1776 brings us to a radical new understanding of the traditional heroic creation myth of the United States.
Art

Caught between the Lines

Author: Carlos Riobó

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 198

View: 639

Caught between the Lines examines how the figure of the captive and the notion of borders have been used in Argentine literature and painting to reflect competing notions of national identity from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Challenging the conventional approach to the nineteenth-century trope of “civilization versus barbary,” which was intended to criticize the social and ethnic divisions within Argentina in order to create a homogenous society, Carlos Riobó traces the various versions of colonial captivity legends. He argues convincingly that the historical conditions of the colonial period created an ethnic hybridity—a mestizo or culturally mixed identity—that went against the state compulsion for a racially pure identity. This mestizaje was signified not only in Argentina’s literature but also in its art, and Riobó thus analyzes colonial paintings as well as texts. Caught between the Lines focuses on borders and mestizaje (both biological and cultural) as they relate to captives: specifically, how captives have been used to create a national image of Argentina that relies on a logic of separation to justify concepts of national purity and to deny transculturation.
Philosophy

The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Political Theory

Author: Leigh K. Jenco

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 780

View: 903

"The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Political Theory provides an entry point into this burgeoning field by both synthesizing and challenging the terms that motivate it. The handbook demonstrates how mainstream political theory can and must be enriched through attention to genuinely global, rather than parochially Euro-American, contributions to political thinking. Entries emphasize exploration of substantive questions about political life-ranging from domination to political economy to the politics of knowledge-in a range of global contexts, with attention to whether and how those questions may be shared, contested, or reformulated across differences of time, space, and experience. They connect comparative political theory to cognate disciplines including postcolonial theory, area studies, and comparative politics. Creative organizational tools such as tags and keywords aid in navigation of the handbook to help readers trace disruptions, thematic connections, contrasts, and geographic affinities across entries"--
Literary Criticism

Conversions

Author: Simon Ditchfield

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 328

View: 571

Conversions is the first collection to explicitly address the intersections between sexed identity and religious change in the two centuries following the Reformation. Chapters deal with topics as diverse as convent architecture and missionary enterprise, the replicability of print and the representation of race. Bringing together leading scholars of literature, history and art history, Conversions offers new insights into the varied experiences of, and responses to, conversion across and beyond Europe. A lively Afterword by Professor Matthew Dimmock (University of Sussex) drives home the contemporary urgency of these themes and the lasting legacies of the Reformations.