Education

Class Rules

Author: Peter W. Cookson

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 161

View: 790

Class Rules challenges the popular myth that high schools are the “Great Equalizers.” In his groundbreaking study, Cookson demonstrates that adolescents undergo different class rites of passage depending on the social-class composition of the high school they attend. Drawing on stories of schools and individual students, the author shows that where a student goes to high school is a major influence on his or her social class trajectory. Class Rules is a penetrating, original examination of the role education plays in blocking upward mobility for many children. It offers a compelling vision of an equitable system of schools based on the full democratic rights of students. Book Features: Provides a fresh, dynamic way of understanding educational inequality and social reproduction.Offers a breakthrough social/psychological theory of how adolescents acquire class consciousness.Compares the cultures and curricula of five American high schools focusing on the class composition of their students. “This highly readable and original book illuminates why we don’t have open class warfare in our society, despite huge inequalities. Peter Cookson shows how schools reproduce classes through institutional practices that forge class-based consciousness. He also suggests how education might be changed.” —Caroline Hodges Persell, professor emerita of sociology, New York University “Cookson does a superb job of analyzing the powerful forces in our schools that reinforce the racial, ethnic, and social-class structures our nation hopes to overcome. Breaking out of one’s social class was always hard but may now be harder than in previous decades. Cookson reminds us of what high schools can be, the great equalizers, institutions for promoting America’s finest values.” —David Berliner, Regents’ professor emeritus, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, Arizona State University
Education

Teachers Without Borders?

Author: Alyssa Hadley Dunn

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page:

View: 384

" Teachers Without Borders?is the story of four Indian teachers who came to the United States in the face of tremendous personal and professional odds to teach in urban schools. Their experiences are brought to life in this groundbreaking empirical study through interviews with their principals, district representatives in charge of recruitment and orientation, recruitment agency personnel, and union representatives, as well as in-depth classroom observations and student commentary. This well-researched work raises an essential question: If international teachers face daily exploitation, a lack of personal and professional support, and a lack of pedagogical and cultural preparation, are they able to give urban students the high-quality multicultural education they need and deserve? Book Features: An engaging case study that tackles competing discourses about immigration, globalization, and teacher quality. The voices of international teachers highlighting the successes and challenges of their experience and comparisons to teachers in other cities across the country. An examination of the differences in student and teacher expectations and how these influence teaching and learning. Alyssa Hadley Dunnis an assistant professor of urban teacher education at Georgia State University. “Teachers Without Borders?underscores the need for teacher educators and district personnel to incorporate culturally relevant pedagogy into their programs and professional support.” —From the Foreword byJacqueline Jordan Irvine “Teachers Without Borders?documents the advent of hiring international teachers to fill shortages in urban schools. Dunn’s extraordinary analysis shows the lack of preparation of these teachers and, as important, she teaches us how to build the kind of support that will transform this kind of teacher recruitment into a system that matters for students, their schools, and their communities.” —Ann Lieberman, Senior Scholar, Stanford University, co-author ofTeachers in Professional CommunitiesandHow Teachers Become Leaders “Alyssa Hadley Dunn argues that both students and international teachers are being misled. This is an excellent and important study.” —Carl A. Grant, Hoefs-Bascom Professor, University Wisconsin-Madison “In this highly readable case study, Dunn exposes how the rhetoric of ‘cultural awareness’ used to justify hiring temporary international teachers masks a deeper devaluation of teachers, students of color, and pedagogical knowledge.” —Christine Sleeter, professor emerita, California State University, Monterey Bay, co-author ofTeaching with Vision: Culturally Responsive Teaching in Standards-Based Classrooms "Teachers Without Borders?will transport you through the local and the global, interweaving nuanced portraits of teachers from abroad with troubling unveilings of the bigger picture behind teacher recruitment and school reform. Insightful, passionate, and expansive, this book is a must-read.” —Kevin Kumashiro, University of Illinois at Chicago, author ofBad Teacher! How Blaming Teachers Distorts the Bigger Picture; “In this brilliantly rendered case, we see the human consequences when advocates adopt profit-driven strategies, assume quick-fix solutions, and embrace an arid view of teaching and learning. We can also glimpse pathways toward creating a system capable of educating all children in our wildly diverse democracy.” —William Ayers, educator and bestselling author ofTo Teach, Third EditionandTeaching the Taboo “Teachers Without Borders?opens a new window on the complex realities of cultural literacy in our schools, the challenges of culturally responsive pedagogy in our classrooms, and the still promising opportunities for reform today.” —Jeff Biggers, author ofState Out of the Union: Arizona and the Final Showdown Over the American Dream “This highly-readable and moving book couples compelling case studies with hard-hitting social and political critique. In a sensitive yet unflinching analysis, Alyssa Hadley Dunn exposes the complex economic, professional, and humanitarian issues involved in international teacher recruitment. Although many readers will not be aware of this problem before reading the book, they will never be able to forget it once they do.” —Marilyn Cochran-Smith, Cawthorne Professor of Teacher Education, Lynch School of Education, Boston College "
Social Science

No Excuses

Author: Stephan Thernstrom

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 504

Black and Hispanic students are not learning enough in our public schools. Their typically poor performance is the most important source of ongoing racial inequality in America today. Thus, say Abigail and Stephan Thernstrom, the racial gap in school achievement is the nation's most critical civil rights issue and an educational crisis. It's no wonder that "No Child Left Behind," the 2001 revision of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, made closing the racial gap in education its central goal. An employer hiring the typical black high school graduate or the college that admits the average black student is choosing a youngster who has only an eighth-grade education. In most subjects, the majority of twelfth-grade black students do not have even a "partial mastery" of the skills and knowledge that the authoritative National Assessment of Educational Progress calls "fundamental for proficient work" at their grade. No Excuses marshals facts to examine the depth of the problem, the inadequacy of conventional explanations, and the limited impact of Title I, Head Start, and other familiar reforms. Its message, however, is one of hope: Scattered across the country are excellent schools getting terrific results with high-needs kids. These rare schools share a distinctive vision of what great schooling looks like and are free of many of the constraints that compromise education in traditional public schools. In a society that espouses equal opportunity we still have a racially identifiable group of educational have-nots -- young African Americans and Latinos whose opportunities in life will almost inevitably be limited by their inadequate education. When students leave high school without high school skills, their futures -- and that of the nation -- are in jeopardy. With successful schools already showing the way, no decent society can continue to turn a blind eye to such racial and ethnic inequality.
Education

Equity 101- The Equity Framework

Author: Curtis Linton

Publisher: Corwin Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 165

View: 206

Based on the common characteristics observed in highly successful diverse schools, Equity 101 guides educational leaders in creating an environment where excellence is the norm.
Education

The Schools We Need

Author: E.D. Hirsch, Jr.

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 336

View: 718

This paperback edition, with a new introduction, offers a powerful, compelling, and unassailable argument for reforming America's schooling methods and ideas--by one of America's most important educators, and author of the bestselling Cultural Literacy. For over fifty years, American schools have operated under the assumption that challenging children academically is unnatural for them, that teachers do not need to know the subjects they teach, that the learning "process" should be emphasized over the facts taught. All of this is tragically wrong. Renowned educator and author E. D. Hirsch, Jr., argues that, by disdaining content-based curricula while favoring abstract--and discredited--theories of how a child learns, the ideas uniformly taught by our schools have done terrible harm to America's students. Instead of preparing our children for the highly competitive, information-based economy in which we now live, our schools' practices have severely curtailed their ability, and desire, to learn. With an introduction that surveys developments in education since the hardcover edition was published, The Schools We Need is a passionate and thoughtful book that will appeal to the millions of people who can't understand why America's schools aren't educating our children.
Education

Teaching Music in the Urban Classroom, Volume II

Author: Carol Frierson-Campbell

Publisher: Menc the Natl Assoc for Music

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 232

View: 244

Examines the issues of music instruction in urban schools and provides political, philosophical, and practical approaches to music education.
Education

Reaching and Teaching Students in Poverty

Author: Paul C. Gorski

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 256

View: 320

This influential book describes the knowledge and skills teachers and school administrators need to recognize and combat via and inequity that undermine educational engagement for students experiencing poverty. Featuring important revisions based on newly availble research and lessons from the author's professional development work, this Second Edition includes: a new chapter outlining the dangers of "grit" and deficit perspectives as responses to educational disparities; three updated chapters of research informed, on-the-ground strategies for teaching and leading with equity literacy; and an updated Poverty and Class Awareness Quiz. Written with an engaging conversational style that makes complex concepts accessible, this book will help readers learn how to recognize and respond to even the subtlest inequities in their classrooms, schools, and districts.