Social Science

Wives, Husbands, and Lovers

Author: Deborah S. Davis

Publisher: Hong Kong University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 340

View: 667

What is the state of intimate romantic relationships and marriage in urban China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan? Since the 1980s, many conventional expectations have been abandoned following the passage of no fault divorce laws, falling rates of childbearing within marriage, and increased tolerance for non-marital and non-heterosexual intimate relationships. Tracing how the marital “rules of the game” have changed across the region with the uneven retreat of state supervision and control, Wives, Husbands, and Loverschallenges the long-standing assumptions that marriage is the universally preferred status for all men and women in Chinese societies, that extramarital sexuality is incompatible with marriage, or that marriage necessarily unites a man and a woman. Read in dialogue, the chapters compellingly illustrate a new range of potential futures for marriage, sexuality, and family. “Wives, Husbands, and Lovers explores how the dramatic changes in sexuality and marriage since the 1980s are currently challenging the fundamentals of family life in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and China. The authors present vivid descriptions of how increases in premarital sex, premarital cohabitation, divorce, same sex marriage, cross-border sexual and marital relations, and even births outside of marriage have shaken basic assumptions about marriage in all three locales. Even long-time students of East Asia will find much in this book that is surprising and new.” —Martin K. Whyte, Harvard University
History

Husbands, Wives, and Lovers

Author: Patricia Mainardi

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 146

In this interdisciplinary exploration of the cultural and social history of early 19th-century France, Patricia Mainardi focuses on what was considered a major social problem of the time - adultery. In a period when expectations about marriage were changing, the problems of husbands, wives and lovers became a major theme in theatre, literature and the visual arts. The author demonstrates that this intense interest was historically grounded in the post-revolutionary collision between the new concept of the individual's right to happiness and the traditional prerogatives of family and state. duty or happiness more important? Are arranged marriages doomed to be empty of love and poisoned by adultery? Should adulterous wives and their lovers be punished while husbands may commit adultery with impunity? Out of such legal, social and cultural debates ultimately emerged modern bourgeois family values, Mainardi argues. And she illuminates how art, in all its varieties, both influences and is influenced by social change.
Psychology

Adult Children as Husbands, Wives, and Lovers

Author: Steven Farmer

Publisher: McGraw-Hill/Contemporary

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 191

View: 636

Describes how troubled childhoods affect adult relationships and offers specific solutions and exercises for developing healthy relationships
Self-Help

How You Can Survive When They're Depressed

Author: Anne Sheffield

Publisher: Harmony

ISBN:

Category: Self-Help

Page: 320

View: 739

Each year more than 17 million Americans suffer from a depressive illness, yet few suffer in solitude. How You Can Survive When They're Depressed explores depression from the perspective of those who are closest to the sufferers of this prevalent disorder--spouses, parents, children, and lovers--and gives the successful coping strategies of many people who live with a clinical depressive or manic-depressive and often suffer in silence, believing their own problems have no claim to attention. Depression fallout is the emotional toll on the depressive's family and close friends who are unaware of their own stressful reactions and needs. Sheffield outlines the five stages of depression fallout: confusion, self-doubt, demoralization, anger, and finally, the desire to escape. Many people will find relief in the knowledge that their self-blame, guilt, sadness, and resentment are a natural result of living with a depressed person. Sheffield brings together many real-life examples from the pioneering support group she attends at Beth Israel Medical Center of how people with depression fallout have learned to cope. From setting boundaries to maintaining an outside social life, she gives practical tactics for handling the challenges and emotional stresses on a day-to-day basis.
Fiction

Wives, Husbands & Lovers

Author: Damien Dsoul

Publisher: 4play Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 118

View: 182

Ten seductive and highly erotic short stories that showcase hidden inhibitions and sexual depths that occur between cheating housewives, cuckolding husbands and sexually-charged lovers.
Religion

What Wives Wish their Husbands Knew about Sex

Author: Richard Rupp

Publisher: Baker Books

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 176

View: 919

It's an unfortunate reality that many men grow up in churches that suppress their God-given sexual urges. As a result, many Christian men, single and married, are frustrated with their love lives and their sex lives. The authors of this book claim that Christian men should be the greatest lovers in the world and then work to show men how to do it. They help men: -learn what the Bible says about a healthy sex life -discover how to relate to women as men instead of as boys -address psychological and spiritual issues that interfere with healthy sexuality -learn specific techniques that create a strong relationship, great foreplay, and passionate sex Solidly based in Scripture and informed by the experiences of the authors, all respected sex therapists, What Wives Wish Their Husbands Knew about Sex dispels the myths that keep good Christian men from experiencing sex as God meant it to be. Perfect for any man, it is also a great book for counselors and pastors who work with men.
Social Science

How to Pick a Lover

Author: Wesley L. Ford

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 482

View: 465

While it may be considered taboo, any woman married, single, or otherwise should feel good about her decision to take a lover. How To Pick a Lover is a groundbreaking book written to help women have meaningful and rewarding love affairs. How do you choose a lover? There are no time-honored rules, Greek chorus, or yenta to tell you what qualities to look for or how to avoid potential minefields. Literature is ripe with cautionary tales about bad things that happen to good women who stoop to the "folly" of taking a lover. And traditionally, a womans sexuality has been secondary to that of a mans. How To Pick a Lover takes you on a journey of self-discovery, exploring your right to emotional and sexual fulfillment including the option of having a lover. Many of your attitudes and beliefs about courting and being courted will be challenged throughout the pages of this book. In return, you will gain insights into the attributes and behaviors of men positive and negative that you must pay attention to if you are to pick a lover that is right for you.
History

Revolutions without Borders

Author: Janet Polasky

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 613

Nation-based histories cannot do justice to the rowdy, radical interchange of ideas around the Atlantic world during the tumultuous years from 1776 to 1804. National borders were powerless to restrict the flow of enticing new visions of human rights and universal freedom. This expansive history explores how the revolutionary ideas that spurred the American and French revolutions reverberated far and wide, connecting European, North American, African, and Caribbean peoples more closely than ever before. Historian Janet Polasky focuses on the eighteenth-century travelers who spread new notions of liberty and equality. It was an age of itinerant revolutionaries, she shows, who ignored borders and found allies with whom to imagine a borderless world. As paths crossed, ideas entangled. The author investigates these ideas and how they were disseminated long before the days of instant communications and social media or even an international postal system. Polasky analyzes the paper records—books, broadsides, journals, newspapers, novels, letters, and more—to follow the far-reaching trails of revolutionary zeal. What emerges clearly from rich historic records is that the dream of liberty among America’s founders was part of a much larger picture. It was a dream embraced throughout the far-flung regions of the Atlantic world.
Family & Relationships

Infidelity

Author: Elissa Gough

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 148

View: 818

By exploring the motivations behind infidelity, how to prevent it, how to identify a troubled marriage, and what can be done to restore a relationship, the author helps readers get their lives back on track.
Social Science

Sanctions And Sanctuary

Author: Dorothy A Counts

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 268

View: 911

Bringing together evidence from 15 Western and non-Western societies - ranging from hunter-gatherers to urban Americans - this book examines wife-beating from a worldwide perspective. Cross-cultural comparison aims to give a more accurate picture of cultural influences on wife-battering and to show the commonalities and differences of the phenomeno
History

Women, Crime, and Forgiveness in Early Modern Portugal

Author: Darlene Abreu-Ferreira

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 250

View: 352

Looking at the experiences of women in early modern Portugal in the context of crime and forgiveness, this study demonstrates the extent to which judicial and quasi-judicial records can be used to examine the implications of crime in women’s lives, whether as victims or culprits. The foundational basis for this study is two sets of manuscript sources that highlight two distinct yet connected experiences of women as participants in the criminal process. One consists of a collection of archival documents from the first half of the seventeenth century, a corpus called 'querelas,' in which formal accusations of criminal acts were registered. This is a rich source of information not only about the types of crimes reported, but also the process that plaintiffs had to follow to deal with their cases. The second primary source consists of a sampling of documents known as the ‘perdão de parte.’ The term refers to the victim’s pardon, unique to the Iberian Peninsula, which allowed individuals implicated in serious conflicts to have a voice in the judicial process. By looking at a sample of these pardons, found in notary collections from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Abreu-Ferreira is able to show the extent to which women exercised their agency in a legal process that was otherwise male-dominated.
Social Science

Woman, the Actuality

Author: A.K. Pant

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 308

View: 283

Marriage is not a moral sexual debauchment consented by the society instead it describes an ethical limit of morality in sexual relations beyond which the sexual relations are considered to be illicit or adultery. Marriage is a great attempt to keep the society free from sexual debauchment by assigning one man for one lady and one lady for one man. Marriage is not a compulsion instead it is a confession done with mutual consent to live a peaceful life devotedly with each other. From the point of view of sexual relations, marriage is a factor which distinguishes human from animals. It is sacred tribute to ancestors. It is an indication of family succession or genealogy. Marriage is a ritual to provide social as well as legal acceptance to the child in the womb. Marriage is an indication of the death of the parents in the form of coming generations as it assures the eternal truth that older one has to end to provide the life and opportunities to the incoming generations. For men, marriage is in fact performing the moral, ritualistic and materialistic duties while for women this is mere the accomplishing of sanctifying rites and following the codes of conduct. Marriage is not an agreement done on behalf of a legal contract instead it is a complete dedication free from compulsions. Wherever forementioned feelings do not exist in the background of the objectives of marriage, there marriage means mere accomplishment of sexual satisfaction and false ego and in this situation, marriage is just like a contract which if done by a man with one lady or four ladies, is mere sexual debauchment in the point of view of the morals and ethics.
History

Man and Wife in America

Author: Hendrik Hartog

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 139

In nineteenth-century America, the law insisted that marriage was a permanent relationship defined by the husband's authority and the wife's dependence. Yet at the same time the law created the means to escape that relationship. How was this possible? And how did wives and husbands experience marriage within that legal regime? These are the complexities that Hendrik Hartog plumbs in a study of the powers of law and its limits. Exploring a century and a half of marriage through stories of struggle and conflict mined from case records, Hartog shatters the myth of a golden age of stable marriage. He describes the myriad ways the law shaped and defined marital relations and spousal identities, and how individuals manipulated and reshaped the rules of the American states to fit their needs. We witness a compelling cast of characters: wives who attempted to leave abusive husbands, women who manipulated their marital status for personal advantage, accidental and intentional bigamists, men who killed their wives' lovers, couples who insisted on divorce in a legal culture that denied them that right. As we watch and listen to these men and women, enmeshed in law and escaping from marriages, we catch reflected images both of ourselves and our parents, of our desires and our anxieties about marriage. Hartog shows how our own conflicts and confusions about marital roles and identities are rooted in the history of marriage and the legal struggles that defined and transformed it.
Alimony

Fathers, Husbands, and Lovers

Author: Sanford N. Katz

Publisher: [Chicago] : American Bar Association, Section of Family Law

ISBN:

Category: Alimony

Page: 318

View: 316

Religion

Friends and Lovers

Author: Joel R. Beeke

Publisher: Cruciform Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page:

View: 792

Not a comprehensive marriage manual, and not a complete exploration of the theological significance of marriage, this book focuses on two key ingredients in a vital marriage: friendship and sexual intimacy. Drawing from the wisdom of the Bible, especially Proverbs, CBeeke shows you how to grow closer to your spouse, emotionally and physically.
History

Separated by Their Sex

Author: Mary Beth Norton

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 661

In Separated by Their Sex, Mary Beth Norton offers a bold genealogy that shows how gender came to determine the right of access to the Anglo-American public sphere by the middle of the eighteenth century. Earlier, high-status men and women alike had been recognized as appropriate political actors, as exemplified during and after Bacon’s Rebellion by the actions of—and reactions to—Lady Frances Berkeley, wife of Virginia’s governor. By contrast, when the first ordinary English women to claim a political voice directed group petitions to Parliament during the Civil War of the 1640s, men relentlessly criticized and parodied their efforts. Even so, as late as 1690, Anglo-American women’s political interests and opinions were publicly acknowledged. Norton traces the profound shift in attitudes toward women’s participation in public affairs to the age’s cultural arbiters, including John Dunton, editor of the Athenian Mercury, a popular 1690s periodical that promoted women’s links to husband, family, and household. Fittingly, Dunton was the first author known to apply the word "private" to women and their domestic lives. Subsequently, the immensely influential authors Richard Steele and Joseph Addison (in the Tatler and the Spectator) advanced the notion that women’s participation in politics—even in political dialogues—was absurd. They and many imitators on both sides of the Atlantic argued that women should confine themselves to home and family, a position that American women themselves had adopted by the 1760s. Colonial women incorporated the novel ideas into their self-conceptions; during such "private" activities as sitting around a table drinking tea, they worked to define their own lives. On the cusp of the American Revolution, Norton concludes, a newly gendered public-private division was firmly in place.