Literary Criticism

Women in the Metropolis

Author: Katharina von Ankum

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 184

Bringing together the work of scholars in many disciplines, Women in the Metropolis provides a comprehensive introduction to women's experience of modernism and urbanization in Weimar Germany. It shows women as active participants in artistic, social, and political movements and documents the wide range of their responses to the multifaceted urban culture of Berlin in the 1920s and 1930s. Examining a variety of media ranging from scientific writings to literature and the visual arts, the authors trace gendered discourses as they developed to make sense of and regulate emerging new images of femininity. Besides treating classic films such as Metropolis and Berlin: Symphony of a Great City, the articles discuss other forms of mass culture, including the fashion industry and the revue performances of Josephine Baker. Their emphasis on women's critical involvement in the construction of their own modernity illustrates the significance of the Weimar cultural experience and its relevance to contemporary gender, German, film, and cultural studies.
Cities and towns in literature

Streetwalking the Metropolis : Women, the City and Modernity

Author: Deborah L. Parsons

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Cities and towns in literature

Page: 256

View: 705

Can there be a flaneuse, and what form might she take? This is the central question of Streetwalking the Metropolis, an important contribution to ongoing debates on the city and modernity in which Deborah Parsons re-draws the gendered map of urban modernism. Assessing the cultural and literary history of the concept of the flaneur, the urban observer/writer traditionally gendered as masculine, the author advances critical space for the discussion of a female 'flaneuse', focused around a range of women writers from the 1880's to World War Two. Cutting across period boundaries, this wide-ranging study offers stimulating accounts of works by writers including Amy Levy, Dorothy Richardson, Virginia Woolf, Rosamund Lehmann, Jean Rhys, Janet Flanner, Djuna Barnes, Anais Nin, Elizabeth Bowen and Doris Lessing, highlighting women's changing relationship with the social and psychic spaces of the city, and drawing attention to the ways in which the perceptions and experiences of the street are translated into the dynamics of literary texts.
Social Science

Women in the Metropolis

Author: Katharina von Ankum

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 238

View: 291

"A landmark work of German cultural studies. The richness of the material is dazzling: each of the essays opens up new areas of scholarly inquiry and connects, in surprising and illuminating ways, with other essays in the volume."--Maria Tatar, author of "Lustmord" "These are thought-provoking readings of the 'New Woman's' encounters with modernity in Weimar culture."--Atina Grossmann, author of "Reforming Sex"
History

The Masculine Woman in Weimar Germany

Author: Katie Sutton

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 209

Throughout the Weimar period the so-called "masculinization of woman" was much more than merely an outsider or subcultural phenomenon; it was central to representations of the changing female ideal, and fed into wider debates concerning the health and fertility of the German "race" following the rupture of war. Drawing on recent developments within the history of sexuality, this book sheds new light on representations and discussions of the masculine woman within the Weimar print media from 1918–1933. It traces the connotations and controversies surrounding this figure from her rise to media prominence in the early 1920s until the beginning of the Nazi period, considering questions of race, class, sexuality, and geography. By focusing on styles, bodies and identities that did not conform to societal norms of binary gender or heterosexuality, this book contributes to our understanding of gendered lives and experiences at this pivotal juncture in German history.
History

Disorderly Women in Eighteenth-Century London

Author: Tony Henderson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 252

This is the first full-length study of prostitution in London during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It is a compelling account, exposing the real lives of the capital's prostitutes, and also shedding light on London society as a whole, its policing systems and its attitudes towards the female urban poor. Drawing on the archives of London's parishes, jury records, reports from Southwark gaol as well as other sources which have been overlooked by historians, it provides a fascinating study for all those interested in Georgian society.
History

Unmarried Motherhood in the Metropolis, 1700–1850

Author: Samantha Williams

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 718

In this book Samantha Williams examines illegitimacy, unmarried parenthood and the old and new poor laws in a period of rising illegitimacy and poor relief expenditure. In doing so, she explores the experience of being an unmarried mother from courtship and conception, through the discovery of pregnancy, and the birth of the child in lodgings or one of the new parish workhouses. Although fathers were generally held to be financially responsible for their illegitimate children, the recovery of these costs was particularly low in London, leaving the parish ratepayers to meet the cost. Unmarried parenthood was associated with shame and men and women could also be subject to punishment, although this was generally infrequent in the capital. Illegitimacy and the poor law were interdependent and this book charts the experience of unmarried motherhood and the making of metropolitan bastardy.
Political Science

The Changing Canadian Metropolis

Author: Frances Frisken

Publisher: Berkeley : Institute of Governmental Studies Press, University of California, Berkeley ; Toronto : Canadian Urban Institute

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 847

View: 257

History

Prairie Metropolis

Author: Esyllt W. Jones

Publisher: Univ. of Manitoba Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 528

At the turn of the twentieth century, Winnipeg was the fastest-growing city in North America. But its days as a diverse and culturally rich metropolis did not end when the boom collapsed. Prairie Metropolis brings together some of the best new graduate research on the history of Winnipeg and makes a groundbreaking contribution to the history of the city between 1900 and the 1980s. The essays in this collection explore the development of social institutions such as the city’s police force, juvenile court, health care institutions, volunteer organizations, and cultural centres. They offer critical analyses on ethnic, gender, and class inequality and conflict, while placing Winnipeg’s experiences in national and international contexts.
History

Sex and Class in Women's History

Author: Judith L. Newton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 911

The essays collected in this volume reflect the upsurge of interest in the research and writing of feminist history in the 1970s/80s and illustrate the developments which have taken place – in the types of questions asked, the methodologies employed, and the scope and sophistication of the analytical approaches which have been adopted. Focusing on women in nineteenth-century Britain and America, this book includes work by scholars in both countries and takes its place in a long history of Anglo-American debate. The collection adopts 'the doubled vision of feminist theory', the view that it is the simultaneous operation of relations of class and of sex/gender that perpetuate both patriarchy and capitalism. This view informs a wide variety of contributions from 'Class and Gender in Victorian England', to 'Servants, Sexual Relations and the Risks of Illegitimacy', 'Free Black Women', 'The Power of Women’s Networks', and 'Socialism, Feminism and Sexual Antagonism in the London Tailoring Trade'. Both the vigour and the urgency of scholarship infused with social aims can be clearly felt in the essays collected here.
History

Workers in the Metropolis

Author: Richard Briggs Stott

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 478

The working class in New York City was remade in the mid-nineteenth century. In the 1820s a substantial majority of city artisans were native-born; by the 1850s three-quarters of the city's laboring men and women were immigrants. Richard B. Stott discusses the ways in which the influx of this large group of young adults affected the city's working class. What determined the texture of working-class life during the antebellum period? Stott addresses these questions as he explores the social and economic dimensions of working-class culture.
Social Science

Women In The Cities Of Asia

Author: James T Fawcett

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 426

View: 772

Women in Asia are on the move. The migration of women from village to city has increased dramatically in the past decade, and many of these new migrants are young single women seeking jobs. In several Asian countries, women migrants now outnumber men by a substantial margin. Along with the physical movement from rural to urban areas come new roles
Literary Criticism

Women in Weimar Fashion

Author: Mila Ganeva

Publisher: Camden House

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 941

New view of the crucial role of fashion discourse and practice in Weimar Germany and its significance for women.
Political Science

Work, Wages, and Welfare in a Developing, Metropolis

Author: R. Mohan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 403

View: 990

Based on five years of in-depth investigation, this is a readable, concise summary of one of the largest research projects ever undertaken on a major city in a developing country. The book examines five key urban sectors--housing, transport, employment location, labor markets, and public finance--in the developing cities of Bogotá and Cali, Colombia. After an initial overview of the study and its goals, Mohan goes on to set Bogotá in its national urban and economic context and discusses such critical issues as income distribution, poverty, the characteristics of the labor force, labor force participation and earnings, women and the labor market, and social and spatial inequalities. With its abundance of quantitative information, coupled with a unique depth and breadth of coverage, this book makes an invaluable contribution to our understanding of the effect of policies and projects on developing countries.
Performing Arts

Designing Women

Author: Lucy Fischer

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 237

Grand, sensational, and exotic, Art Deco design was above all modern, exemplifying the majesty and boundless potential of a newly industrialized world. From department store window dressings to the illustrations in the Sears, Roebuck & Co. catalogs to the glamorous pages of Vogue and Harper's Bazar, Lucy Fischer documents the ubiquity of Art Deco in mainstream consumerism and its connection to the emergence of the "New Woman" in American society. Fischer argues that Art Deco functioned as a trademark for popular notions of femininity during a time when women were widely considered to be the primary consumers in the average household, and as the tactics of advertisers as well as the content of new magazines such as Good Housekeeping and the Woman's Home Companion increasingly catered to female buyers. While reflecting the growing prestige of the modern woman, Art Deco-inspired consumerism helped shape the image of femininity that would dominate the American imagination for decades to come. In films of the middle and late 1920s, the Art Deco aesthetic was at its most radical. Female stars such as Greta Garbo, Joan Crawford, and Myrna Loy donned sumptuous Art Deco fashions, while the directors Cecil B. DeMille, Busby Berkeley, Jacques Feyder, and Fritz Lang created cinematic worlds that were veritable Deco extravaganzas. But the style soon fell into decline, and Fischer examines the attendant taming of the female role throughout the 1930s as a growing conservatism challenged the feminist advances of an earlier generation. Progressively muted in films, the Art Deco woman—once an object of intense desire—gradually regressed toward demeaning caricatures and pantomimes of unbridled sexuality. Exploring the vision of American womanhood as it was portrayed in a large body of films and a variety of genres, from the fashionable musicals of Josephine Baker, and Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers to the fantastic settings of Metropolis, The Wizard of Oz, and Lost Horizon, Fischer reveals America's long standing fascination with Art Deco, the movement's iconic influence on cinematic expression, and how its familiar style left an indelible mark on American culture.
Architecture

Dar es Salaam. Histories from an Emerging African Metropolis

Author: James Brennan

Publisher: African Books Collective

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 279

View: 347

From its modest beginnings in the mid-19th century, Dar es Salaam has grown to become one of sub-Saharan Africa's most important urban centres. A major political, economic and cultural hub, the city stood at the cutting edge of trends that transformed twentieth-century East Africa. Dar es Salaam has recently attracted the attention of a diverse, multi-disciplinary, range of scholars, making it currently one of the continent's most studied urban centres. This collection from eleven scholars from Africa, Europe, North America and Japan, draws on some of the best of this scholarship and offers a comprehensive, and accessible, survey of the city's development. The perspectives include history, musicology, ethnomusicology, culture including popular culture, land and urban economics. The opening chapter offers a comprehensive overview of the history of the city. Subsequent chapters examine Dar es Salaam's twentieth century experience through the prism of social change and the administrative repercussions of rapid urbanization; and through popular culture and shifting social relations. The book will be of interest not only to the specialist in urban studies but also to the general reader with an interest in Dar es Salaam's environmental, social and cultural history. James Brennan is a Lecturer in History at the School of Oriental & African Studies (SOAS), University of London. His research interests include nationalism and urbanization in Tanzania, and he is currently researching the historical role of radio and other mass media in East Africa's political culture. Andrew Burton is an Honorary Research Fellow of the British Institute in Eastern Africa, based in Addis Ababa. He has published widely on East African urban culture; and his current interests are the history of youth, urbanization and delinquency in Eastern Africa. Yusuf Lawi is the former Head of the Department of History at the University of Dar es Salaam; and is currently Senior Lecturer in History and Deputy Director of the University's Centre for Continuing Education. He specializes in environmental and social history.
Public toilets

Paddington

Author: James Stevenson (M.D.)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Public toilets

Page: 22

View: 725